Any figures of dates of maturity of the various plants or crops and of yields must necessarily be only approximately or averagely correct; but methods of multiplication allow of more definite statement.

Maturity-Tables

Time required for maturity of different garden crops, reckoned from the sowing of the seeds

Days prom Seed

Time required, from setting, for fruit-plants to bear. (For northern and central latitudes)

Apple - 3 to 5 years. Good crop in about 10 to 18 years. Apple, on paradise stocks, good crops in 4 to 5 years. Blackberry - 1 year. Good crops in 2 and 3 years.

Citrous fruits (oranges, lemons, etc.) - 2 to 3 years. Good crop 2 or 3 years later.

Cranberry - 3 years gives a fair crop.

Currant - 1 year. Good crops in 2 and 3 years.

Gooseberry - 1 year. Good crops in 2 and 3 years.

Grape - Fair crop in 4 years.

Peach - 2 years. Good crop in 4 and 5 years.

Pear - 3 or 4 years. Fair crop in 6 to 12 years; dwarfs in 5 to 7 years.

Persimmon, or Kaki - 1 to 3 years.

Quince - 2 years. Good crop in 4 years.

Raspberry - 1 year. Good crop in 2 and 3 years.

Plum - 3 years. Good crop in 5 or 6 years.

Strawberry - 1 year. Heaviest crop usually in 2 years.

Average profitable longevity of fruit-plants under high culture

Apple......

35-50 years

Peach......

8-12 years

(Less in parts of the prairie states and more in northeastern states.)

Pear.......

50-75 years

Persimmon, or Kaki, as long as an

Blackberry....

6-10 years

apple-tree.

 

Currant.........

20 years

Plum.......

20-25 years

Gooseberry........

20 years

Raspberry.....

6-10 years

Orange and Lemon .

50 or more

Strawberry..........

1- 3 years

When serious trouble from diseases is to be apprehended, the plantation may be brought into early fruiting and then destroyed before the disease makes great headway. This is particularly applicable to blackberries, raspberries, and strawberries.

Yield-Tables

Average full yields per acre of various horticultural crops

The yields of those crops in which the salable products are equal in number to the number of plants per acre, and in which the product is sold by the piece, are to be calculated from the planting-tables in Chap. VI - such as cabbage, celery, and the like. Usually the profits are secured from yields above the average. The statements here given are growers' estimates rather than census figures.

Apples - A tree 20 to 30 years old may be expected to yield from 25 to 40 bushels every alternate year.

Artichoke - 200 to 300 bushels.

Beans, Green or Snap - 75 to 120 bushels.

Beans, Lima - 75 to 100 bushels of dry beans.

Beets - 400 to 700 bushels.

Carrots - 400 to 700 bushels.

Corn - 50 to 75 bushels, shelled.

Cranberry - 100 to 300 bushels. 900 bushels have been reported.

Cucumber - About 150,000 fruits per acre.

Currant - 100 bushels.

Egg-plant - 1 or 2 large fruits to the plant for the large sorts like New York Purple, and from 3 to 8 fruits for the smaller varieties.

Gooseberry - 100 bushels.

Grape - 3 to 5 tons. Good raisin vineyards in California, 15 years old, will produce from 10 to 12 tons.

Horseradish - 3 to 5 tons.

Kohlrabi - 500 to 1000 bushels.

Onion, from seed - 300 to 800 bushels. 600 bushels is a large average yield.

Parsnips - 500 to 800 bushels.

Pea, green in pod - 100 to 150 bushels.

Peach - In full bearing, a peach tree should produce from 5 to 10 bushels.

Pear - A tree 20 to 25 years old should give from 25 to 45 bushels.

Pepper - 30,000 to 50,000 fruits.

Plum - 5 to 8 bushels may be considered an average crop for an average tree.

Potato - 100 to 300 bushels.

Quince - 100 to 300 bushels.

Raspberry and blackberry - 50 to 100 bushels.

Salsify - 200 to 300 bushels.

Spinach - 200 barrels.

Strawberry - 75 to 250 or even 300 bushels.

Tomato - 8 to 16 tons.

Turnip - 600 to 1000 bushels.

For yields of seeds in various garden crops (by seed-growers), see p. 105.