In looking for a farm, the inquirer should consider the question pri-i marily from a business point of view. He should know what are the " points " of a good farm. It is well to make a list of the points, to study the place with reference to them, and to score it under each, as one would score a horse or a cow. The points or attributes are of two classes: those that are internal, or part of the farm itself; and those that are external, or have to do with geographical location, neighborhood, and the like. Some of the points may be mentioned: —

Internal

Lay of the land, or topography

Size of the farm

Shape of the farm

Kind of soil

Condition of soil as regards fertility and physical properties

Drainage

Water-supply

State of cultivation

Crops now standing, and their condition

Woodland

Character of fields and of fences

Buildings and other improvements

Kind of farming to which place is adapted

External

Climate

Healthfulness

Neighborhood

Distance from town or railway station

Shipping facilities

Means of communication

Labor supply

Markets in which to buy and sell

School and church privileges

Character of the farming in the community

Rural organizations

Likelihood of increase or decrease in value

Score-card for farms (Warren) Size                                                                                                                  Standard

Fields

Topography

Fertility

Points of a good farm 99

Condition

17.   As affecting animal and crop production.......

18.   As affecting number of days of labor ........

Healthfulness

Location

Score-card for farms — Continued Size                                                                                                                   Standard

Water-supply

Improvements

Total ....................

Deductions for................

Score ... ..................

Area in acres..................

Price asked...................

Price per acre..................

Price per acre (excluding waste land)..........

Estimated value.................

Which farm would you prefer to buy?.........

The number of points assigned in the foregoing score-card is not the limit, but is suggestive. For example, if the water-supply is exceptionally good, give it more than forty points. Any other exceptional values may be scored more than the points assigned. In some cases, a deduction of all the points assigned is not sufficient. Distance to market may absolutely disqualify a farm for the sale of milk. If the score-card is followed exactly, this farm may score higher than a fairly good farm near market. In all such cases, deduct additional points from the total score. It is only by this flexibility that scores can be made that are truly comparable. The best farm for the purpose should have the highest final score. The chief purposes of a score-card are to make the examination systematic and to prevent the forgetting of important items.

If the points are not properly distributed for the kind of farming to be followed, a new distribution of points should be made before comparing farms. For example, for truck farms, all points that have to do with ease of tillage should be given a higher rating, while fertility is of less importance. In irrigated sections, water right, alkali, and ease of application of water must be included.