Fluid No. 1. — Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde (formalin)............... 1 part

Alcohol..................... 5 parts

Water, to make..................50 parts

To prepare one gallon of the fluid 31/2 ounces of formaldehyde and 16 ounces of alcohol will be required, the remainder of the gallon to be made up with water.

The addition of a volume of hydrogen peroxide equal to that of the formaldehyde has been found to somewhat enhance the value of this fluid for red fruits.

Fluid No. 2. — Boric Acid

Boric (boracic) acid................. 1 part

Alcohol..................... 5 parts

Water, to make..................50 parts

For one gallon, 31/2 ounces of boric acid and 16 ounces of alcohol will be required.

The powdered form of boric acid is the most convenient to use. There is no necessity to employ hot water, but stirring should be continued until complete solution is effected.

Fluid No. 3. — Zinc Chloride

Zinc chloride................... 3 parts

Alcohol.....................10 parts

Water, to make..................100 parts

For one gallon of fluid, 5 ounces of zinc chloride and 16 ounces of alcohol will be required.

Zinc chloride, of good quality, passes readily into solution; any white, flocculent precipitate that may appear is allowed to settle out, and the clear fluid decanted.

Fluid No. 4. — Sulfurous Acid

Sulfurous acid................... 1 part

Alcohol ..................... 1 part

Water, to make..................10 parts

For one gallon, 16 ounces each of sulfurous acid and of alcohol will be required.

Fluid No. 5. — Copper Sulfate

Copper sulfate................... 2 parts

Alcohol.....................10 parts

Water,.to make..................100 parts

For one gallon, 31/5 ounces of copper sulfate and 16 ounces of alcohol will be required.

To facilitate solution, powder the copper sulfate (bluestone) and dissolve it in a small quantity of hot water ; when cold, add the alcohol and the remainder of the water to the required volume.

Fluid No. 6. — Alum

Alum ..................... 5 parts

Alcohol.....................10 parts

Water, to make..................100 parts

For one gallon, 8 ounces of alum and 16 ounces of alcohol will be required.

If powdered alum is not obtainable, crush the crystals and dissolve as directed in No. 5.

For the most successful treatment, it is desirable to have the fruit sound, unbruised, and not over-ripe when placed in the fluid. When practicable, the fruit should be left on the stalk or branch, the whole being so supported or suspended in the bottle that the fruit is not subjected to any undue pressure. Sufficient fluid should be used to completely cover the fruit. It is well to hermetically seal the stopper with melted paraffin and to keep the bottles of preserved fruit in a cool, darkened room.                   

Recommendation on the six Canadian recipes.

In the following paragraphs, the fluids are indicated that have proved to be the best preservatives with the various fruits under trial.

Apples and Crabs.

Red: No. 2 ; the best fluid in the larger number of tests. No. 1 has also proved effective for many varieties. No. 2. A fairly satisfactory fluid. Green and russet: No. 3.

White and yellow: No. 4. This solution, while in most respects quite satisfactory, is apt to give the fruit an unnatural paleness.

Beans in Pod.

Green: No. 5 ; this is undoubtedly the best fluid.

No. 1 may be used for short periods of preservation.

Yellow or wax: No. 3 has given the best results.

No. 4 can be used, but bleaches rather excessively. Currants.

Black: No. 1 and No. 2. Both are fairly satisfactory, the preference being with No. 1. Owing to the large amount of coloring matter extracted at the outset from this fruit, the fluid should be changed, say at the expiration of two or three weeks.