From the turpentine of the pond pine, Pinus serotina, Sudworth, Herty and W. S. Dickson2) obtained an oil by distillation. It is a clear liquid with a pleasant odor reminding of limonene, possessing the following constants: d20o,8478; aD20o_105°36'; nD20ol,4734; A. V. 0; S. V. 1,54; Iodine V. 378; soluble in 1,35 parts of 95 p.c. alcohol at 22,5°, in 4,80 parts of 90 p. c. alcohol, in 8,10 parts 85 p. c. alcohol, 16,20 parts 80 p. c. alcohol and 56 parts of 70 p. c. alcohol. Upon distillation the oil was resolved into the following fractions: 27,4 p.c. with a b.p. of 172 to 175° (aD - 87°53'; nD20o1,4716); 57,0 p.c. with a b.p. of 175 to 180° (aD - 92°21'; nD20o1,4724); 8,4 p.c. with a b.p. of 180 to 185° (aD - 92° 14'; nD20o 1,4744); and 7,2 p.c. above 185° (nD20o= 1,5045). Fraction 175 to 176° (ordinary pressure) yielded upon bromination considerable portions of limonene tetra-bromide, m. p. 103 to 104°. Hence the oil consisted largely of /-limonene.