Origin. The wood of the Japanese cedar, Cryptomeria japonica, Don. {Cupressus japonica, L.) owes its pleasant odor to a volatile oil which can be obtained, with a yield of 1,5 p. c.2), upon distillation with steam.

Properties. Yellow oil; d 0,9453; [a]D - 23° 1'; A. V. 0; E.V. 3,88 1).

Composition. According to C. Kimoto2), the oil contains a substance C30 H48O(?), called sugiol, which boils at 264° and has a specific gravity of 0,935. K. Keimatsu 3) found a dextrogyrate sesquiterpene, cryptene, closely related to cadinene, which adds two molecules of hydrohalogen and contains two ethylene linkages. The oil also contains a polyatomic phenol that yields a dibromide C11 H14 Br2 03.

An oil examined by H. Kimura4) boiled principally between 150 and 160° (17 mm.). It contained cadinene (m. p. of hydrochloride 117 to 118°), also another sesquiterpene, named sugi-nene, which yielded nothing but liquid addition products with hydrogen chloride. Regenerated from the hydrochloride, suginene revealed the following constants: d 0,918; [a]D - 10° 34'. In addition the oil contains a sesquiterpene alcohol which, regenerated from its potassium compound, possesses the following properties: b. p. 162 to 163° (10 mm.); d 0,964; [a]D - 37° 5'.

1) Kimura, Journ. of the pharm. Soc. of Japan 1905, 189; Berichte d. deutsch. pharm. Ges. 19 (1909), 372.

2) Bull. Coll. Agric. (Tokio) 4 (1902), 403; Chem. Ztg. Rep. 26 (1902), 175.

3) Journ. of the Pharm. Soc. of Japan 1905, 189; Report of Schimmel & Co. April 1906, 23.

4) Kimura, Journ. of the pharm. Soc. of Japan 1905, 189; Berichte d. deutsch. pharm. Ges. 19 (1909), 372.

It was named cryptomeriol by Kimura. When purified through its xanthogen derivative, it is changed to the isomeric alcohol, the isocryptomeriol which melts between 135 and 136°. The oil is reported to consist of about 40 p. c. of alcohol and 60 p. c. of sesquiterpenes. Older oils are said to contain more alcohols than fresh oils.