1. Indehiscent Monocarpellary Fruits

{a) The Achene, a superior one-celled, one-seeded fruit with a dry, indehiscent, closely applied but separable pericarp (true fruits of the fig).

(b) The Caryopsis, a superior one-celled, one-seeded, fruit with a dry, indehiscent, inseparable pericarp (Graminaceous fruits).

(c) The Drupe, a superior one-celled, one- or two-seeded, indehiscent fruit with a fleshy or pulpy mesocarp and hard endocarp (prune, pimento, Cocculus indicus).

2. Indehiscent Polycarpellary Fruits

(a) The Nut, a dry, hard, indehiscent, one-celled, one- or two-seeded fruit more or less enclosed in a cupule.

(b) The Schizocarp, an inferior dry, indehiscent fruit, splitting as it ripens into its component carpels, which remain attached to the carpophore (Umbelliferous fruits are two-celled schizocarps).

(c) The Berry, an indehiscent, one or more celled, many-seeded, pulpy fruit (orange, lemon, bitter apple, pomegranate, &c).

3. Dehiscent Monocarpellary Fruits

(a) The Follicle, a superior one-celled, one- or many-seeded fruit dehiscing by one suture only (star anise).

(b) The Legume, a superior one-celled, one- or many-seeded fruit dehiscing by both sutures (senna pod, tamarind).

4. Dehiscent POLYCARPELLARY Fruits

The Capsule, a superior one or more celled, many-seeded, dry, dehiscent fruit (poppy head). Fruits which differ from the capsule in being inferior are often termed capsular (cardamom); the siliqua, a superior, spuriously two-celled, many-seeded, long, narrow fruit dehiscing by two valves from below upwards (mustard) and the silicula, which differs from the siliqua only in being short and broad, are varieties of the capsule.