We have included among our flavoring extracts such substances as are usually called for, as flavors, at the soda counter. Some of them are also sometimes known as essences, and as examples thereof we may name raspberry, strawberry, and pineapple. We do not feel that these artificial flavors merit a separate classification, although perhaps the term essence may be more appropriately applied to such as are compounded of ethers and volatile oils than the term extract. Various mixtures of ethers are made by experts, and denominated by such fanciful titles as essence or extract of pear, plum, quince, currant, etc., and are to be used as flavors in making syrups. We believe, however, that since the introduction of the popular commercial fruit juices these artificial flavors are being displaced in favor of the latter. In our opinion the resemblance of many of them to fruits of the names under which they appear is highly imaginary, but as they are used generally when the fruit is out of season, and by a class of persons neither disposed nor qualified to be critical, there seems to be no complaint.

We will add that these essences may be purchased in the general drug market from dealers in essential oils, and those who propose to carry a full line of rare syrups can obtain these rare fruit flavors with less trouble than they can the ethers that are used in compounding them, and at as low a price as they can buy the ethers and mix them together.

S-1. Flavoring Extract Of Allspice

Oil of allspice, 2 fluidrachms.

Freshly powdered allspice, 2 ounces.

*Alcohol, a sufficient amount.

Rub the oil with the powdered allspice and pack the mixture in a percolator prepared for percolation. Cover with alcohol (using about twenty fluidounces), and when the percolate appears close the exit of the percolator and macerate for a period of twenty-four hours; then percolate slowly until one pint of percolate is obtained. The strength may be increased or diminished to suit the taste of the operator, the quality desired governing in this direction.

*Much commercial alcohol is contaminated with fusel oil and other volatile impurities to such an extent as to impair the flavor of syrups and flavoring extracts. Whenever, with some exceptions, alcohol is directed to be used in this work, the operator will find it best to employ deodorized alcohol.

In some casesas, for example, the harsh, penetrating flavors of almond, peach, sarsaparilla, etc.this precaution is unnecessary, commercial alcohol of good quality answering every purpose.

S-2. Flavoring Extract Of Almonds (Peach)

This extract is made of oil of bitter almonds, but it should be remembered that it is a poison.

Oil of bitter almonds, 1 fluidrachm.

Diluted alcohol, 15 fluidounces.

Dissolve the oil of almonds in one ounce of alcohol and add thereto the diluted alcohol. Shake well together.

This formula may be strengthened or weakened in accordance with the will of the pharmacist. There is no established proportion, that which we suggest being, in our opinion, suitable for most purposes. Extract of almond and extract of peach are identical.

S-3. Flavoring Extract Of Banana

This is usually made extemporaneously of mixtures of other flavoring extracts, a satisfactory formula being as follows:

Flavoring extract of pineapple, 1/2 fluidounce.

Flavoring extract of vanilla, 1/2 fluidounce.

Flavoring extract of strawberry, uncolored, 15 fluidounces.

Mix them together, and if necessary filter through a little carbonate of magnesium, and then color to suit the taste with a mixture of cochineal color and tincture of curcuma.

S-4. Flavoring Extract Of Black Pepper

Recently powdered black pepper,..2 ounces.

Alcohol, water, of each a sufficient amount.

Pack the powder in a percolator prepared for percolation. Cover with alcohol (using about twenty fluidounces), and when the percolate appears close the exit of the percolator and macerate for a period of twenty-four hours. Then percolate slowly until one pint of percolate is obtained. The strength may be increased or diminished to suit the taste of the operator, the quality desired governing in this direction. The diluted alcohol may also be replaced with alcohol to advantage, if the question of economy is not a factor.

S-5. Flavoring Extract Of Capsicum

Fluid extract of capsicum, 1 fluidounce.

Alcohol, 15 fluidounces

Mix them together and color with curcuma modified with cochineal, to suit the taste.

S-6 Flavoring Extract Of Celery

Celery seed, 2 ounces.

Alcohol, a sufficient amount.

Powder the celery seed in an iron mortar, and pack the mixture in a percolator prepared for percolation. Cover with alcohol (using about twenty fluidounces), and when the percolate appears close the exit of the percolator and macerate for a period of twenty-four hours. Then percolate slowly until one pint of percolate is obtained. The strength may be increased or diminished to suit the taste of the operator, the quality desired governing in this direction

This is one of the questionable recent additions, and has been introduced since the fashion of taking "nervines" and tonics came into vogue among patrons of the soda counter.

In our experience alcohol only should be employed in extracting celery seed, the use of diluted alcohol producing a preparation that loses its brilliancy and casts a precipitate.

S-7. Flavoring Extract Of Chocolate

Powdered chocolate, 4 ounces.

Syrup, water, ..of each a sufficient amount.

Rub the chocolate in a mortar with syrup gradually added, until reduced to a cream, then add syrup enough to bring to the measure of eight fluidounces, after which add one pint of water.

Pour the mixture into a pan and bring it to a brisk boil, and then allow to cool.

This extract is of uncertain quality, owing to the variation in commercial chocolates. It is never transparent and is likely to deposit considerable sediment. It will ferment in hot weather, and must either be made in small amounts or put into small bottles that are well filled and kept in a cool place.

Some persons flavor extract of chocolate with vanilla, but in our experience it is not always acceptable.

S-8. Flavoring Extract Of Cloves

Oil of cloves, 2 fluidrachms.

Freshly powdered cloves, 2 ounces.

Alcohol, a sufficient amount.

Rub the oil with the powdered cloves and pack the mixture in a percolator prepared for percolation. Cover with alcohol (using about twenty fluidounces), and when the percolate appears close the exit of the percolator and macerate for a period of twenty four hours. Then percolate slowly until one pint of percolate is obtained. The strength may be increased or diminished to suit the taste of the operator, the quality desired governing in this direction.

S-9. Flavoring Extract Of Cinnamon

Oil of cinnamon (Ceylon preferred), 2 fluidrachms.

Alcohol, diluted alcohol, of each a sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the oil in eight ounces of alcohol, add enough diluted alcohol to produce a permanent cloudiness, and then bring to the measure of a pint with alcohol. Color with tincture of curcuma modified by a little cochineal color and caramel. The strength may be increased or diminished to suit the taste of the operator, the quality desired governing in this direction. The diluted alcohol may also be replaced with alcohol to advantage, if the question of economy is not a factor.

S-10. Flavoring Extract Of Coffee

Freshly roasted Java coffee, 8 ounces.

Alcohol and water mixed, in the propor

tion of alcohol 12, water 4, a sufficient amount.

Powder the coffee coarsely, moisten with the mixed alcohol and water, and pack in a previously prepared, suitable percolator. Cover the powder with the menstruum (about twenty ounces), and when the percolate appears close the exit and allow the coffee to macerate twenty-four hours, then continue the percolation until one pint is obtained.

The remarks we have made concerning the quality of chocolate will apply also to coffee. The process we commend produces an extract that represents the coffee very accurately, and in our opinion the addition of syrup and glycerin is undesirable.

S-11. Flavoring Extract Of Ginger

Jamaica ginger, freshly powdered, 2 ounces.

Alcohol, a sufficient amount.

Pack the powder in a percolator prepared for percolation. Cover with alcohol (using about twenty fluidounces), and when the percolate appears close the exit of the percolator and macerate for a period of twenty-four hours. Then percolate slowly until one pint of percolate is obtained. The strength may be increased or diminished to suit the taste of the operator, the quality desired governing in this direction. The diluted alcohol may also be replaced with alcohol.

S-12. Flavoring Extract Of Ginger (Soluble)

Fluid extract of ginger (U. S. P.), 4 fluidounces.

Magnesium carbonate, water, alcohol, of each a sufficient amount.

Evaporate the fluid extract to one fluidounce, add enough magnesium carbonate to form a creamy mixture, then water to bring to the measure of eight fluidounces, rubbing well together, and filter. To the filtrate add enough alcohol to make a total of sixteen fluidounces. Color. if desirable, with caramel.

Some persons wish a hot peppery taste, and this is made by using a few drops of tincture of capsicum. The operator can determine the necessity for this addition and modify the extract to suit the whim of his patrons.