In recent years fruit juices have largely replaced some of the artificial flavors of former times. These juices are manufactured in large amounts by experienced men, and druggists usually find it better to purchase them than to attempt their manipulation. They produce delicious syrups, and, in our opinion, are very much to be preferred to most of the ordinary imitation syrups that are made of artificial ethers. Full directions for making syrups accompany them, and we need not, therefore, consider these substances in detail. While we do not recommend an attempt at manufacturing these juices generally in a small way, we believe it often judicious for the apothecary to make syrups direct from some of the juicy fruits when they are plentiful and in season. The following are suggested if the respective fruit is abundant and cheap; if not, it is better to purchase fruit juices on the market and make the syrup therefrom*. *Men who devote their entire attention to these problems become expert, and even learn to make close imitations of natural juices by artificial methods. Their knowledge is gained at the expense of much study and experiment, and represents heavy investments, and it is needless to observe that detailed results are not distributed promiscuously .

S-57. Blackberry (Fruit) Syrup

Heat ripe blackberries to the boiling point and express the juice. To four pints of juice add six pounds of sugar, dissolve by heat, and bottle securely while hot. It must be kept in a cool, dark location.

S-58. Raspberry (Fruit) Syrup

Heat ripe berries to the boiling point and express the juice. To four pints of juice add six pounds of sugar, dissolve by heat, and bottle securely while hot. It must be kept in a cool, dark location.

S-59. Strawberry (Fruit) Syrup

Heat ripe berries to the boiling point and express the juice. To four pints of juice add six pounds of sugar, dissolve by heat, and bottle securely while hot. It must be kept in a cool, dark location.

S-60. Cherry (Fruit) Syrup

Heat ripe fruit to the boiling point and express the juice. To four pints of juice add six pounds of sugar, dissolve by heat, and bottle securely while hot. It must be kept in a cool, dark location.

S-61. Grape (Fruit) Syrup

Heat ripe fruit to the boiling point and express the juice. To four pints of juice add six pounds of sugar, dissolve by heat, and bottle securely while hot. It must be kept in a cool, dark location.

S-61. Pineapple (Fruit) Syrup

Wash and then slice the pineapples thinly, without removing the peel; then mix therewith one pound of sugar for each pound of fruit, and occasionally stir the mixture for two or three days, then squeeze the syrup therefrom and bottle it.

S-63. Quince (Fruit) Syrup

Quarter and seed the quinces without removing the peel. Slice thinly, and mix therewith one pound of sugar for each pound of fruit, and occasionally stir the mixture for two or three days, then add some water if too thick, and squeeze the syrup therefrom and bottle it. Most persons peel such fruits as pineapple and quince, and thereby lose the rich aroma which mostly resides in the peel. Quince especially becomes insipid if peeled.

Other fruit syrups can be made of juicy fruits by similar methods.