There are some occupations which are more or less closely connected with dietetics. Workers in lead, plumbers, painters, polishers, pottery glaziers, et al, should be taught to be very careful to cleanse the clothing, hands, and especially their finger nails, before eating. The soft crumb of bread getting under the nails easily becomes contaminated with lead salts, which by this means are conveyed to the stomach, where the white-lead carbonate, which is insoluble in water, is dissolved by the gastric juice into a more dangerous chloride. Workers in dyestuffs, artificial flowers, green wall papers, and other materials in which arsenic is used, should be similarly careful, and should never be permitted to bring their food into the workrooms.

The following Table, compiled by A. P. Bryant for the Yearbook of the U. S. Department of Agriculture for i898, presents a Comparison of the Average Food Consumption of People of Different Occupations or in Different Conditions of Life.

(Per man per day)

Families Studied.

Cost.

Protein.

Fats.

Carbohy-drates.

Fuel value.

Average of 10 farmers' families in Vermont, Connecticut, and New York........................

Cents.

Grms.

Grms.

Grms.

Cals.

Food purchased.

101

136

483

3,655

Food eaten.....

97

I30

467

3,515

Average of 14 mechanics' families in Connecticut, New Jersey,

Tennesse and Indiana .....

Food purchased.

110

l6l

425

3,690

Food eaten

19

103

I50

402

3,465

Average of 14 professional men's families in Connecticut, Penn- sylvania, Indiana, and Illinois..

Food purchased.

108

132

429

3,435

Food eaten

28

IO4

125

423

3,325

Average of 15 college clubs in Maine, Connecticut, Tennessee, and Missouri

Food purchased.

130

I87

519

4,390

Food eaten.....

I07

148

459

3,690

Average of above 53 studies

Food purchased.

113

156

463

3,810

Food eaten.....

103

138

436

3,5oo

Average of 2 labourers' families in New york city

Food purchased.

IO3

119

356

2,950

Food eaten

19

IOI

116

344

2,905

Average of 11 poor families in

New york city

Food purchased.

96

98

414

3.005

Food eaten

15

93

95

407

2,915

Average of 2 labourers' families, very poor, in Pittsburg, pa

Food purchased.

81

98

311

2,525

Food eaten

II

80

95

308

2,485

Average of 2 labourers families, more comfortable circumstances, in Pittsburg, pa

Food purchased.

121

148

534

4,055

Food eaten

19

120

147

534

4,045

Average of 12 negro families in

Alabama

Food purchased.

9

67

134

453

3,375

Average of 4 Italian families in

Chicago. Ill

Food purchased.

16

103

111

391

3,060

Average of 5 French Canadian families in Chicago. Ill

Food purchased.

22

118

158

345

3,365

Average of 4 families of Russian

Jews in Chicago, Ill

Food purchased.

19

120

101

406

3,095

Average of 8 Bohemian families in Chicago, Ill

Food purchased.

12

115

101

360

2,885

Some occupations - those of foundrymen, stokers, and porcelain manufacturers - necessitate exposure to extremely high temperatures. Profuse sweating results, and thirst. The thirst is quenched by subsequently drinking enormous quantities of fluid, which should be water or oatmeal water, not too cold, rather than beer or other alcoholic beverages. Their lives at best are apt to be shortened by the suddenness and severity of the changes to which their kidneys and circulation are subjected, and a resort to alcohol is soon fatal.

Tea tasters acquire more or less poisoning, although they do not swallow the beverage, for a good deal is absorbed by the mucous membrane of the mouth. The symptoms are insomnia, nightmare, headache, "nervousness," tremors, dyspepsia, and constipation. Even smelling the tea infusions constantly is poisonous to some sensitive persons (Chambers). To mitigate the danger they should eat abundantly before exposing themselves to the noxious effects of their occupation.

Among other diseases occasioned by the handling of food products may be mentioned the grocer's itch, from handling low grades of sugar (now much less common than formerly, owing to better methods of refining), and the bronchial diseases produced by the inhalation of flour and grain dust in grist mills and grain elevators.

There are, in addition, many occupations which directly interfere with the proper digestion of food, such as those of tailors and shoemakers, whose cramped positions compress the abdominal viscera and impede full respiratory action. Their discomfort from dyspepsia and flatulency teaches them to avoid eating vegetables and sweets.

All occupations conducted in close, ill-ventilated apartments are injurious by depriving the individual of sufficient oxygen to consume the food products in the system.