Weight, Ounces

Per cent of Proteid

Ounces of Proteid

Per cent of Carbohydrate

Ounces of Carbohydrate

Per cent of Fat

Ounces of Fat

Oatmeal...

1/2

16 7

0835

66.2

0331

2.3

.0365

Cream...

3

2 5

.075

4.5

•135

18.5

• 555

Orange...

3

.6

.018

8.5

•255

.1

.003

Bread ...............

5

11.9

•595

51.5

2.575

.3

.015

Butter...

1 3/8

1.0

• 013

...

...

85.0

1.168

Potato...

6

3.6

.216

22.4

.344

4 5

.270

Milk.................

7

3.3

.231

5.0

.350

4.0

.280

Flour..............

3/8

79

.029

76 4

.286

1.4

.005

Cold Beef............

2

22.3

.446

...

28 6

• 572

Chocolate...

1/3

12. 9

• 043

30.3

.101

48.7

.162

Sugar...

3

100.0

3.000

...

...

Tomato...

4

. 9

.036

3 9

.156

.4

.016

Crackers.........

1/8

9.8

.012

73.1

.091

9.1

.011

Beefsteak...

6

239

1-434

...

10.2

.612

Lettuce...

1

.1

.001

2.5

.025

.2

.002

Oil ..........................

1/4

....

...

..

100 0

.250

Strawberries.........

4

•9

036

70

.280

.6

.024

47

3 268

8.929

3.981

Total Amount Of Food Consumed During The Day

Proteid

Carbohydrate

Fat

3 268 ounces

8.929 ounces

3.981 ounces

or

or

or

92.615 grams

253.019 grams

112.821 grams

There are 28.34 grams (28 1/3) in an ounce.

Fuel And Energy Value Of Food Consumed

Calories

92.615 grams proteid x 4.1=....

379.7

253.019 grams carbohydrate x 4.1=...

1,037.3

114.821 grams fat x 9.3 = ...

. 1,049.0

Total....

2,466.0

Of course this involves a great deal of calculation, and no one would think of undertaking so much extra work often. As stated on page 60, the chief value of calculating a few dietaries is in giving- a definite idea of the composition of food. It is not expected or necessary that each day's ration should conform to any standard. It is only when the diet is calculated for a considerable period of time that it becomes of much use for comparison.

The method of studying the diet for a month is described on page 59. When this is done, there is in reality less calculation involved, for then the figures are based on the amount of raw materials used and the composition of each individual dish need not be calculated. That is, the total weight of flour, butter, milk, eggs, and sugar is known and there only remains the allowance to be made for waste.

The whole subject of standard dietaries is in a somewhat chaotic state at present. Professor Chittenden's experiments have shown that it is possible to maintain health and strength on about half the amount of proteid recommended in the standard dietaries. If Dr. Folin's theory is correct (see following article), any ordinary diet contains more than sufficient proteid for the physiological needs of the body. Nearly all dietetians agree that, from the physiological standpoint, it is immaterial whether the body obtains its supply of heat and energy from fats, carbohydrates, or proteids.

But all this does not mean that a proper balance between the food materials is not necessary for health. Digestibility, bulk, personal taste and habit must be considered. The problem, then, of the balanced ration becomes an individual one, to be solved according to the conditions and experience of each individual person. To make the best selection of foods it is necessary to know as much as possible about the composition of all ordinary foods. Then proper cooking and serving and especially the manner of eating and the amount eaten are fully as important as the composition. So there is no royal road to the selection of a best diet, but experience based on knowledge should give good judgment. - M. Le Bosquet.

Fuel And Energy Value Of Food Consumed 50