The following tests can be applied not only to individual subjects, but also to groups of subjects. They can be best conducted in a classroom containing the usual equipment of desks, blackboards, etc.

Tests 1 and 2 require no materials other than writing materials for each subject. The materials required for tests 3 to 7 consist in printed forms which may be purchased in packages of 25 from The Morningside Press, 417 West 118th Street, New York.

The following table gives the age norms for each test established by application to large numbers of subjects:

Table 21

Ages in Years.

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1. Digit span, 1 of 3.............

4

5

5

5

6

6

6

2. Logical memory, points........

3

17

25

31

34

38

41

3. Cancelling A, in 1 minute......

16

23

27

30

35

38

42

4. Completion, Trabue A .............

0

4

8

12

16

20

24

5. Opposites, in 1 minute .................

0

2

7

8

9

10

12

6. Part-whole, in 1 minute........

0

0

5

6

8

9

10

7. Word building, in 5 minutes.. ..

0

1

4

5

6

8

9

Ages in Years.

13

14

15

16

17

18

1. Digit span, 1 of 3 .......................

6

7

7

7

7

8

2. Logical memory, points ..............

43

44

44

45

45

50

3. Cancelling A, in 1 minute......

48

50

54

57

59

60

4. Completion, Trabue A ..............

28

32

36

40

44

48

5. Opposites, in 1 minute.........

14

15

16

17

19

20

6. Part-whole, in 1 minute .................

11

12

15

16

18

19

7. Word building, in 5 minutes.. . .

11

12

13

14

16

18

Test 1. Digit Span. Instructions

"Now I am going to say some easy numbers. Listen to them carefully, and when I am through I want you to write them down in the same order as given." Illustrate by a simple example. Then take in sequence the following groups of digits, calling them clearly, at the standard rate of one per second:

Set A Set B Set C

641 352 837

4739 2854 7261

42835 31759 98176

374859 521746 417925

9728475 2813439 4162593

72534896 49853762 95423718

438923517 981725436 629471583

Scoring

The score is the largest number of digits a subject can repeat, once out of three different trials, as above.

Test 2. Logical Memory. Instructions

"Now I am going to see how well you can remember things. I shall read some words to you, several in a group. When I have finished, try to write them down in exactly the same order that I gave them. If you cannot remember some of the words, make a mark where each of them goes, and put in the proper places all the other words you can remember." Read the words clearly, not more rapidly than one per second. Use the following:

A - street, ink, lamp.

B - spoon, horse, chair, stone.

C - ground, clock, boy, chalk, book.

D - desk, milk, hand, card, floor, cat.

E - ball, cup, glass, hat, fork, pole, cloud.

F - coat, girl, house, salt, glove, watch, box, mat.

Scoring

A credit of 2 points is allowed for each correct word in the right position, 1 point being allowed for a correct word not in the right position. There are 33 words, hence the maximum score is 66 points. Credit any word that resembles closely in sound the correct word (thus "cut" for "cup," "mill" for "milk"). Disregard spelling.

Test 3. Cancellation. Instructions

Put the paper before the subject with the printed side down. Say: "When you turn the paper over you will find a lot of letters, all mixed up. You must draw a line like this (illustrate) through every A that you can find. Mark out every A, but do nothing to the other letters. I want to see how many A's you can mark out in one minute. Do you understand? All ready, go."

Scoring

The score is the number of A's cancelled in one minute. Ignore errors, both omissions and cancellations of wrong letters.

Test 4. Completion. Instructions

"See what it says at the top of the page. On each blank write the word which makes the best meaning. Only one word on each blank. Wherever there is a blank some word has been left out. You are to write the word in each place so that there will be a good meaning. (Illustrate, using the sentence "See the----------dog.") Where there are two blanks you must use two words. Do as many of them as you can. You have twenty minutes for this."

Scoring

Grade each sentence 2, 1 or 0, giving 2 for a perfect meaning, 1 for an inferior but acceptable meaning, and 0 for failure or incompleteness or meaninglessness. Ignore spelling. The score is the total number of points.

Test 5. Opposites. Instructions

"When you turn the paper over you will find on the other side a list of words, with an empty space for you to write something beside each word. You are to write beside each word the word that means just the opposite of that word. If the first word is "long" what will you write? If the next word is "up" what will you write? Now do you understand? If you can't think of a word right away, just go on to the next. I want to see how many you can do in one minute. All ready, go." The words on the standard list are as follows: good, outside, quick, tall, big, loud, white, light, happy, false, like, rich, sick, glad, thin, empty, war, many, above, friend.

Scoring

The score is the number of correct opposites, giving credit for every word that could by any possible means be considered an opposite of a test word, except that adverbs or nouns are not credited for adjectives, nor adjectives for nouns.

Test 6. Part-Whole. Instructions

"When you turn the paper over you will find twenty words, each of which names a part of something. You are to write after each word some word that means the whole of the thing. For example, if one word were "wheel" you could write "engine," because a wheel is a part of an engine. Or if one word were "toe" you could write "foot" because a toe is a part of afoot. All ready, go."

Scoring

The score is the number of correct responses given in one minute. The words are: window, leaf, pillow, button, nose, smokestack, cog-wheel, cover, letter, petal, page, cob, axle, lever, blade, sail, coach, cylinder, beak, stamen.

Test 7. Word Building. Instructions

"You see these letters? A-E-I-R-L-P. You can make words out of these letters. For example you can say E-A-R, "ear" and that is a word. But could you say R-A-T "rat"? No, because there is no T there. Could you say P-I-L-L, "pill "? No, because there is only one L there. So you must make as many words as you can from just these letters. Do not use any letters that are not there. Do not use any letter more than once in the same word. Do you understand? Now I am going to let you have five minutes, and I want to see how many words you can make. Write them all on the paper. Ready, go."

Scoring

The score is the number of words correct (and correctly spelled) excluding obsolete and foreign words, and abbreviations. About 60 words are possible.