Tincture of opium. One of the strongest of the opiate medicines. It is therefore a powerful anodyne and hypnotic (sleep-producer).

Dose, for a grown person, from fifteen to thirty drops. In diarrhoea, however, as small a dose as ten drops will often answer. Children are more affected by opiates, in proportion to their age, than by any other kind of medicine. One drop will be more than enough for an infant less than a year old; at least to begin with.

Laudanum is often applied externally to relieve pain. On a sound part of the skin, in a grown person, half a teaspoonful may be so applied with safety; but only a few drops at a time, even externally, in the case of a young child.

Anodyne injections into the bowels are most frequently made of laudanum and starch. (See injections.) For hypodermic injection (under the skin) solution of morphia is preferred.

In keeping laudanum, it should be remembered that it strengthens with age, by evaporation of some of its alcohol. (All tinctures are made with alcohol.) What is left at the bottom of an old bottle of laudanum may be two or three times as strong as a fresh article would be.