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The New Interior: Modern Decorations For The Modern Home | by Hazel H. Adler



It is hoped that this book will be of practical aid to that large body of intelligent people who are seeking to create for themselves expressive and individual environments of life. It does not aim to set down cut and dried rules and principles, or to attempt to enforce any particular type or style of decoration, but to suggest new possibilities and open new trains of thought by setting forth those fresh and stimulating currents which are influencing the creators of what has been called "the new taste" in interior decoration...

TitleThe New Interior: Modern Decorations For The Modern Home
AuthorHazel H. Adler
PublisherThe Century Co.
Year1916
Copyright1916, The Century Co.
AmazonThe New Interior: Modern Decorations for the Modern Home

Living Porch Of Country House At Seashore By Paul Zimmerman

To The Pioneers Of The New Movement And Especially To The One Who Inspired Me To Join The Ranks

-Preface
It is hoped that this book will be of practical aid to that large body of intelligent people who are seeking to create for themselves expressive and individual environments of life. It does not aim to...
-Chapter I. "Twentieth-Century American"
THE contention that America is essentially an inartistic nation and must always look to other countries for her artistic inspiration, is as absurd as it is unfounded. The same power that impelled the ...
-"Twentieth-Century American". Part 2
Pulled rugs are made from strips of rag or wool dyed to suit the maker, but these strips are pulled through coarse canvas on which a design has been traced, giving the modern artist great leeway. Inst...
-"Twentieth-Century American". Part 3
To the making of tiles America has contributed the excellent dull glazed Grueby, the symbolic and picturesque Moravian, and the richly colored Pewabic, Rookwood and Batchelder. Among the simpler type...
-Chapter II. The New Point Of View
THE new point of view in the decoration of the home may be characterized as the artist's as opposed to the upholsterer's. What would you think of an artist who, sitting before an empty canvas, indulge...
-The New Point Of View. Part 2
In America where individualism is rampant, personalities widely varied, and the resources of the world practically at the command of even moderate purses, there should be a thousand and one decorative...
-The New Point Of View. Part 3
Another highly successful decorative scheme was suggested by Japanese print. Clear red, indigo, and yellow were introduced in the plain thin silk hangings of the three rooms down-stairs. The walls wer...
-The New Point Of View. Part 4
The impression that the use of bright color is a sign of crude and barbaric taste and that only neutral shades are permissible in house decoration is, no doubt, the logical reaction against the misuse...
-Chapter III. Modern Ideas In Walls, Furniture, And Fabrics
TO grasp the new point of view one must first sweep away the old preconceptions of decorating and furnishing and approach the subject with a free and unbiased mind. Decoration, it must be remembered, ...
-Modern Ideas In Walls, Furniture, And Fabrics. Part 2
Linen and burlap make excellent backgrounds. The linen is best hand dyed, as it has an effective richness of texture and unevenness of tone. It should be fairly coarse and sturdy and very carefully st...
-Modern Ideas In Walls, Furniture, And Fabrics. Part 3
Woodwork should be employed either to afford an artistic contrast to the walls or should be conceived as a part of them - that is in the same shade. Woodwork which does not serve to increase the beaut...
-Modern Ideas In Walls, Furniture, And Fabrics. Part 4
For young people starting out in their own home, it is also often wiser to begin to furnish on a very simple scale, in spite of family appropriations, because simple furnishings allow for a stimulatin...
-Chapter IV. The Little Touches
IT is the little things which count in decoration as well as in life - those carefully planned touches which bring a room out of type and stamp it with charm and individuality. It may lie merely in th...
-The Little Touches. Part 2
Lamps can be made to cast a magic glow over a room, to obliterate its hard outlines and emphasize its pleasing contours, to give it life, and tone, and color, both in the daytime and at night, and the...
-The Little Touches. Part 3
One long-stemmed rose in a slender vase which will keep it in position, is a thing of beauty in line, which should give joy to a whole household; a group of three at different stages of opening, with ...
-Chapter V. The Emancipation Of The Dining Table
THE conventional setting of the dining table de-fies every law of design and composition, says Marshall Fry, the artist who is largely responsible for its emancipation; and another critic has referr...
-The Emancipation Of The Dining Table. Part 2
The table decoration illustrated in the photograph was suggested by some peasant pottery brought from Brittany. The plates and bowls had strong bands of blue and yellow and quaint little Breton figure...
-The Emancipation Of The Dining Table. Part 3
The scheme in Photograph II shows a more serious treatment of the dinner table. Soft yellow Wedge-wood was chosen for the tableware. The cloth was of fine yellow linen on to which a wide border of gra...
-Chapter VI. Children's Rooms
THIS century has been referred to as the Century of the Child, but thus far it seems to have been principally the century of the baby! The modern American nursery is, indeed, a tribute to the taste a...
-Children's Rooms. Part 2
Suggestions for color schemes which are in the real child spirit and are characteristic of various types of children may be found in the best foreign and American modern illustrated books for children...
-Children's Rooms. Part 3
A sand-box usually causes more scoldings than pleasure, but a Japanese garden with stones and trees, houses, bridges, and people, which can be readjusted with a view to new landscape effects, is both ...
-Children's Rooms. Part 4
A deep jutting window provides an admirable playroom when partitioned off from the bedroom in some way. In one case a deep window place was built on over the porte-cochere. It was reached from the chi...
-Chapter VIII. Little Houses, Cottages, And Bungalows
THIS is the day of the small house, one astute critic has observed; the residence planned for comfort and convenience, not for ostentation, and dependent on few servants. People are getting over th...
-Little Houses, Cottages, And Bungalows. Part 2
Another entrance-hall was conceived in several shades of gray with touches of soft yellow which stamped it with the quiet, dove-like quality which was manifested throughout the house. Walls and woodwo...
-Little Houses, Cottages, And Bungalows. Part 3
There are still the chairs to be selected and one is open to a wide range of choice in these. There are the good old Windsors well suited to many modern types of decoration; there are the woven, spind...
-Little Houses, Cottages, And Bungalows. Part 4
The hangings here are of yellow, green, and white Japanese crepe, with a green homemade rug on the floor. Upstairs there is a rose and deep blue bedroom, a green and yellow one, and a blue and sage g...
-Chapter IX. The Possibilities Of The City Apartment
YEAR after year has witnessed an ever-increasing exodus from individual to communal roofs and the apartment house has gradually developed more and more colossal proportions, greater and greater facili...
-The Possibilities Of The City Apartment. Part 2
The large window was treated as the emphatic point of the living-room. From beneath the yellow and black valence fell thin yellow silk glass curtains which gave the effect of constant sunshine. A box ...
-The Possibilities Of The City Apartment. Part 3
Now in regard to the hall itself! It may be a difficult problem, but there is no excuse for covering the walls with dark figured paper or burlap which makes formed by continuing the tinted gray ceilin...
-The Possibilities Of The City Apartment. Part 4
The placing of the piano presents itself as an embarrassing problem in apartment decoration. Of course, if one is preeminently musical, the logical procedure is to convert the living-room into a music...
-Chapter X. Making Over Old Houses
THERE is a fascination in making over old houses which is seldom attendant upon the planning of new. Thrift is, indeed, the mother of many charming inventions. The presence of the merest outer shell s...
-Making Over Old Houses. Part 2
The curtains were the coarsest square mesh cream-colored scrim and a small deep sea-blue rug was used on the linoleum floor. Coarse Italian linen served for napkins, sometimes combined with Armenian l...
-Making Over Old Houses. Part 3
The back hall led from the stairway to what once had been the back porch. It was replaced by a flagstone paved court which was shaded by an awning and used as a terrace. The front veranda could only b...
-Making Over Old Houses. Part 4
Great results can be accomplished by a decorative regeneration of old houses without any structural changes at all. A house which is put to hard and conscientious family service should be thoroughly ...
-Chapter XI. The Country House
A GENUINE love of nature, and a growing interest in outdoor games and sports, has gradually undermined the formal character of the old-time country house. The realization of the fact that the country ...
-The Country House. Continued
The terrace is the Englishman's porch. It is usually located between the wings at the back of the house, overlooking the garden. There is always shade to be found at one end or the other, but it is al...
-Chapter XII. New Environments For Old Furniture
OLD applied to furniture is an ambiguous adjective. It may refer to style, actual or relative age, or state of preservation. Age may be its most vaunted merit, or merely a means of excusing its defi...
-New Environments For Old Furniture. Continued
If your furniture is good it must be made important, and not become lost against a heavy background, or one cluttered with distracting objects. Every care should be exercised to bring out the beauty o...
-Chapter XIII. A New System Of Color Organization
IN the modern school of painting which depends for its effects upon color more than any other single factor, the lack of some solid basis for its constructive use has been felt as a serious drawback, ...
-A New System Of Color Organization. Continued
It will be found that chords 1, 3, and 5 have three of their five colors in common, so they are a related chord group. The other row comprising, 2, 4, and 6, are also a related chord group. The last o...
-Chapter XIV. The Modern Church Interior
ART, after being born and nurtured in the Church, seems to have made a wide detour around it in modern times. The ultimate form of many churches is shaped far more by the dogmatic decrees of the deaco...
-Chapter XV. Suggestions For Modern Connoisseurs And Collectors
THERE are two kinds of collecting; the one rescues memorable objects from the scrap-heaps of the past, and the other gathers together memorable objects of the present to be rescued from the scrap-heap...
-Suggestions For Modern Connoisseurs And Collectors. Continued
When Mr. Harvey Chatfield disregarded the usual flaunting grapes, winecups, dishes of gold and pearls of tradition in his binding of a rare edition of Omar, and substituted, instead, a design of exq...
-Chapter XVI. My Studio
MY studio was not intended to set a shining example, nor did it aim to evade all responsibility by being a mere workshop. It is simply the little home which my husband and I have evolved through a num...
-My Studio. Continued
A lovely old oblong walnut table, which we had come upon quite accidentally in a dim corner of a modern furniture shop, was placed against the wall on the left side of the reception room. Its beautifu...







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previous page: The Practical Book Of Interior Decoration | by Harold Donaldson Eberlein, Abbot Mcclure, Edward Stratton Holloway
  
page up: Decoration Making Books
  
next page: The Art Of Decoration | by H. R. Haweis