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The Practical Book Of Interior Decoration | by Harold Donaldson Eberlein, Abbot Mcclure, Edward Stratton Holloway



It is hard to understand why someone has not written such a book as this before, a book covering the three great needs of anyone approaching in any capacity the matter of household decoration. History is a treasure house of the crystallised experience that has slowly evolved in past ages, a treasure house ready for us to draw upon as we will. The limit of our taking from its stores is marked only by our capacity to receive. This is especially true in the case of so concrete a subject as interior decoration where many enduring examples of the best achievements of former generations in that field have been preserved for us practically intact...

TitleThe Practical Book Of Interior Decoration
AuthorHarold Donaldson Eberlein, Abbot Mcclure, Edward Stratton Holloway
PublisherJ. B. Lippincott Company
Year1919
Copyright1919, J. B. Lippincott Company
AmazonThe Victorian House Book: A Practical Guide to Home Repair and Decoration
The Practical Book Of Interior Decoration 1The Practical Book Of Interior Decoration 2
-Foreword
It is hard to understand why someone has not written such a book as this before, a book covering the three great needs of anyone approaching in any capacity the matter of household decoration. Histor...
-Foreword. Continued
Whether or not the services of a decorator be retained, may we urge the wisdom of not trying to hasten unduly the completion of a scheme. It is infinitely better to proceed deliberately, to accomplish...
-Part I. Historic Period Decoration In England, Italy, Spain And France
Finally, there should grow the most austere of all mental qualities; I mean the sense for style. It is an aesthetic sense, based on admiration for the direct attainment of a foreseen end, simply and w...
-Chapter I. Interior Decoration In England Prior To The Eighteenth Century
Introduction Sixteenth century England will ever ha endued with a glamour all its own in the eyes of those over whom history exerts a fascinating hold or in whose mental background a strong sense of ...
-Interior Decoration In England Prior To The Eighteenth Century. Part 2
Architectural Background And Methods Of Fixed Decoration Allusion has already been made to the domestic architecture of the age of Elizabeth, which was largely a composite of Flemish Renaissance form...
-Interior Decoration In England Prior To The Eighteenth Century. Part 3
The interiors during early Stuart or Jacobean times were substantially the same in their principal features as the Elizabethan rooms already described. Certain motifs of carved decoration, such as Eom...
-Interior Decoration In England Prior To The Eighteenth Century. Part 4
Furniture And Decoration During the sixteenth century and the early part of the seventeenth the articles of furniture in common use were somewhat restricted in number. Chests of all sizes and of all ...
-Interior Decoration In England Prior To The Eighteenth Century. Part 5
The inlay or marqueterie of divers coloured woods and bone was of simple but effective execution and generally showed an adaptation of some of the motifs already mentioned. The aid of colour was more ...
-Interior Decoration In England Prior To The Eighteenth Century. Part 6
Other Decorative Accessories And Movable Decorations In no country has skillful needlework ever commanded more sincere admiration or counted a greater number of proficient devotees than in England. I...
-Chapter II. Interior Decoration In England And America During The Eighteenth Century And The First Three Decades Of The Nineteenth
Introduction In England and America, the eighteenth century and the first three decades of the nineteenth, which really belong to the pre-ceding century through stylistic affinities and as a directly...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 2
It is safe to say that there was never a time when interior architectural woodwork was carried to an higher point of development or displayed more admirable characteristics. Even in the simpler houses...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 3
At the same time, while the spirit of classic purism was dominant, there were numerous successful and acceptable adventures into the realm of Baroque design, as witnessed, for instance, by some of the...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 4
Window trims, while vigorously designed, were comparatively plain and nearly all of the carved and moulded architectural enrichment was bestowed upon the overdoor decorations, cornices and friezes and...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 5
The Adelphi were no less formal in their modes of expression than their predecessors, but their formality was vastly more varied, richer and intensely genial. There was a finesse and a polish about th...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 6
Mirrors fulfilled an important function in the fixed decoration of many Adam rooms and were set above mantels, over consoles in symmetrical placings or sometimes in the panelling of doors, the gilded ...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 7
In the early years of the nineteenth century, although the architectural and decorative influence of the Adelphi was still strong and far-reaching and constituted a force to be reckoned with, other in...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 8
Door and window trims were bold and heavy in detail and, when any attempt was made at ornamentation beyond flat, rectangular mouldings, Greek key fret and anthemion motifs generally appeared and also ...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 9
During the early Georgian period, and synchronously with the carved and gilt Kentian pieces and the architects' furniture, a great deal of the other furniture underwent a process of elaboration that...
-Interior Decoration In England & America During 1800-1930. Part 10
Other Decorative Accessories And Movable Decorations During the early part of the eighteenth century, the tapestries which had played so important a part in the decorative composition of former times...
-Chapter III. Interior Decoration In Italy Prior To The Eighteenth Century
Introduction The golden age of Italian wall decoration, furniture making and furnishing began about the middle of the fifteenth century and continued through the sixteenth and seventeenth. It was ver...
-Furniture In Italy Prior To The Eighteenth Century And Its Decoration
From the middle or latter part of the fifteenth century onward, the display of movable furniture in the regal rooms of Italian palaces and villas, and in the scarcely less regal rooms of the lesser co...
-Furniture In Italy Prior To The Eighteenth Century And Its Decoration. Part 2
Not dissimilar to it in general appearance was the writing cabinet, of which examples occurred at an early date, with doors in the lower part and a falling front in the upper which, when let down, pro...
-Furniture In Italy Prior To The Eighteenth Century And Its Decoration. Part 3
Materials And Colour For the fixed architectural background, the materials most commonly used were stone, inlaid and multi-coloured marbles, tiles or wood for the floors. For the walls they employed ...
-Chapter IV. Interior Decoration In Italy During The Eighteenth Century
Introduction As the period before the eighteenth century had been an era of spacious dimensions, of great and lofty rooms, of dignified splendour and splendid dignity, of intense virility and vigour ...
-Interior Decoration In Italy During The Eighteenth Century. Part 2
The tall and elaborately ornamented chimney piece, reaching from the mantel to the ceiling or nearly to the ceiling, gradually disappeared as an inseparable structurally incorporated factor of the per...
-Interior Decoration In Italy During The Eighteenth Century. Part 3
As to the great variety of contours to be met with throughout the century, it is well for the reader to remember that analogies in form between Italian furniture and contemporary types in England and ...
-Interior Decoration In Italy During The Eighteenth Century. Part 4
The decorative devices used as motifs in the application of the foregoing decorative processes were numerous and widely varied but seemed to enjoy periods of special favour and follow each other in cy...
-Chapter V. Interior Decoration In Spain Prior To The Eighteenth Century
INTERIOR decoration in Spain prior to the eighteenth century presents a curious combination of Moorish characteristics, on the one hand, and of Renaissance and Baroque features on the other. In consi...
-Interior Decoration In Spain Prior To The Eighteenth Century. Furniture And Decoration
The two most significant and characteristic items of Spanish Renaissance furniture were the chest and the vargueno cabinet (v. illustration in Part III). There were chests of all varieties and shapes ...
-Chapter VI. Interior Decoration In Spain During The Eighteenth Century
THE eighteenth century so far as Spanish,invention in architecture or decorative art was concerned was a singularly barren period. Spain had nothing to contribute beyond a few evidences of national in...
-Chapter VII. Interior Decoration In France Prior To The Eighteenth Century
Introduction The story of interior decoration in France prior to the eighteenth century begins with a phase in which the body was Gothic and the clothes Renaissance; it ends with the full development...
-Style Louis XII
In the interiors of the Style Louis XII the embrasured windows were of good size, had either square heads or very flat elliptical arches, and were usually two lights wide, divided in the centre by a s...
-Style Francis I
The most numerous type of win8 dow in the Francis I style was square-headed. An occasional variation was the rounding of the shoulders. This detail, however, chiefly appeared outside and did not affec...
-Style Henri II
The Style Henri II marks the very height and flower of the French Renaissance, the climax to which all previous development was only preparatory. It is logical and straightforward in all its character...
-Style Henri IV And Louis XIII
In this style of decoration Baroque influences, and especially flemish Baroque influences, began to make themselves more and more conspicuous. The crisp delicacy and restraint of the Style Henri II we...
-Style Louis XIV
In his admirable summarisation of characteristics that dominated the style of Louis XIV, W. H. Ward (Architecture of the Renaissance in France) says, No government, however powerful, and no monarch, ...
-Style Louis XIV. Continued
Furniture And Decoration During the sixteenth century, Renaissance forms of furniture completely ousted any remaining traces of Gothic design. Gothic influence, however, persisted for a time in the h...
-Chapter VIII. Interior Decoration In France During The Eighteenth Century And The First Decades Of The Nineteenth
Introduction The story of interior decoration in France during the eighteenth century and the first decades of the nineteenth is not only dramatically fascinating from the merely human point of view,...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 2
That Bococo should have run to irresponsible extravagance was, perhaps, not unnatural when we remember the rigid centralised systematisation of life, thought, and of every kind of decorative expre...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 3
Architectural Background And Methods Of Fixed Decoration In the preparation of the fixed architectural or interior decorative backgrounds of the Louis Quinze or Rococo style of decoration, using the ...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 4
Panelling, indeed, was the chief resource (Plates 37, 38 B, 42, 43, 44 and. 46) by which the momentous item of wall treatment was compassed. Wood was the favourite and most universally satisfactory me...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 5
One of the most characteristic motifs employed - we should not be far amiss in calling it the trademark of the Rocaille phase of Louis Quinze decoration, just as the scroll composed of interrupted c...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 6
While marble-tiled floors might now and then be employed in galleries and a few large apartments, wooden floors were almost universally prevalent and were very commonly parquetted with varicoloured wo...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 7
During the preceding epoch mirrors had proved too valuable a decorative accessory to be dispensed with and they continued in high favour for the spaces over mantels and likewise for insertion in panel...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 8
Floors were usually of wood and it was customary to enhance the entire decorative ensemble of the room by introducing geometrical patterns parquetted (Plate 49) in several woods of different contrasti...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 9
Mantels of marble, stone or wood, were low and severe in line (Plate 50); there was a straight lintel, and the shelf was supported on simple round columns, on elongated scroll brackets or upon caryati...
-Interior Decoration In France During 1800-1930. Part 10
Other Decorative Accessories And Movable Decorations During the dominance of the Rococo style, tapestries of the old pattern continued in use to some extent where large, formal rooms or galleries lef...
-Chapter IX. Nineteenth Century Episodes And After
Introduction Howsoever wonderful the nineteenth century may have been as an era of phenomenal material progress and of unprecedented mechanical, engineering and scientific achievement, it was distinc...
-Nineteenth Century Episodes And After. Continued
Furniture And Decoration The furniture properly cognate to the carpenters' Classic phase, in the matter of architectural background, was of the swollen and clumsy late American Empire type, which w...
-The "New" Decoration An Examination Of The "Modern" Method
When a new tendency or movement first reaches the attention of the public, and particularly if in some of its manifestations it be rather startling, several attitudes of mind immediately become eviden...
-What Is Our Modern Life?
It is undeniable that there is in our present existence (and those whose disposition it is to ignore the past are invited to remember that there has also been in most ages) an element which is hectic,...
-Verve And Freshness
That the injection of these qualities into our homes would be an exceedingly desirable thing was effectively borne in upon the writers when for selective purposes they had the task of going over some ...
-Part II. Practical Decoration And Furnishing
- you cannot separate art and recreation, and yon can not separate art and business. The list includes items which we consider as amusements, and items which we think of as business. We began with dan...
-Chapter I. The Basis Of Successful Decoration The Interior As A Whole
Planning IT would be a comparatively easy task for the writers to lay down an accumulation of abstract principles governing the different phases of Interior Decoration. They hope, however, to do much...
-Four Methods Of Furnishing
I. International-Inter Period Decoration By far the most satisfactory method of furnishing, either for the elaborate or the simple house or apartment, is that combining nationalities and periods whic...
-Chapter II. Colour And Colour-Schemes
FORM and Colour are the twin foundation stones of art. Form must come first, before the application of colour, but construction is the province of the architect. Wall decoration when extensive may be ...
-Colour And Colour-Schemes. Continued
Red It is perhaps safe to say that when the colour red is mentioned many understand by it the colour which is represented by vermilion; nor is this strange when even writers on interior decoration gi...
-Colour In Decoration. White And Black
White, not properly a colour, is here mentioned first of all, and for that very reason. It is both a neutral and a universal harmoniser. From the dee-orator's point of view we should consider as whit...
-Colour In Decoration. Yellow, Orange And Brown
As previously seen, yellow stands for light and in its pure shades makes for cheerfulness in rooms which have but moderate sunlight. By the same token, in strongly lighted rooms it makes for glare. If...
-Colour In Decoration. Red And Its Derivatives
In its proper shades and proper proportions red is of eminent value in interior decoration. An all red room is too suggestive of the infernal regions for sane and cultured folk. Perhaps the frieze of ...
-Colour In Decoration. Blues
There are entrancing tones of blue, the employment of which amply justifies the popularity of this colour in decorative use. There are, however, other shades of coldness or hardness of which one can o...
-Colour In Decoration. Violet, Mauve And Mulberry
As will later be seen Violet is a heavily worked colour in the Newer decoration, elsewhere it is not so greatly employed as others. We sometimes see rather effective rooms for women in its lighter ...
-Colour In Decoration. The Greys
Normal grey is a fusion of equal powers of the three primary colours, yellow, red and blue. But if there is an excess of any one or two of these the tone would naturally lean toward the colour or colo...
-Colour As Dictated By Periods And Styles
It should be remembered that in certain periods certain colours, patterns, and textiles were most used with the interiors and furniture of those periods. These have all been duly treated under those p...
-The Proportions Of Colours
The proportions in which the respective colours in a colour-scheme should be used have been given and we may mention those in a particular harmony: Sage 14/32, slate and citron 5/32, each, green 6/22...
-Unity And Variety In Household Decoration
The improvement in household decoration is one of the most encouraging signs of American artistic development, but in many instances it is but partial: only in the case of the most widely cultured, or...
-The Use Of Colour In Decoration
Blue and the greens which contain but the normal proportion of yellow are retiring and are cool. All shades of yellow and of red, except those largely neutralised by the admixture of other colours or...
-The Use Of Colour In Decoration. Continued
Second Bedroom. If this room communicates with the first (a portion of which is shown in Plate 59) it should by all means be in the same colouring of green, rose and white. This does not presuppose mo...
-The Correlative Plan
As has been said, yellow, orange and red are dominant and advancing colours except when attenuated by the admixture of other colours or of black or white. Suppose, therefore, we attenuate them. Yellow...
-The Larger Scope
A consideration of unity and variety would not be complete without thought directed toward the decoration of larger premises than those so far discussed. Their treatment is at once easier and more dif...
-The Use Of Colour In The "Modern" Decoration
The employment of colour is probably the most outstanding feature of this method of decoration, described in the last chapter of Part I, and the more extreme examples of its use are apt to irritate pe...
-Chapter III. Walls, As Decoration And As Background
THE treatment of walls is one of the fundamentals of decoration; and this is evident when we realise that no furnishing, however handsome in itself, will constitute a good interior unless the walls, a...
-Panelled Walls
These and their appropriate ceilings are primarily of Period character and where a distinctly period style of decoration is desired a correct following of that style is necessary. Modern architects ha...
-Stone, Masonry, Plaster And Special Finishes
In large houses of appropriate architectural character the walls of halls, stairways and some of the other more public portions may be of cut stone, as may also be specially designed studios, living-r...
-White And Plainly Tinted Walls
In an old Dutch Colonial house, the roof of which descended to the hillside upon which it was built, the interior walls bore both the tooth and tone of time. Its purchasers, with enlightened common-se...
-Decorative Walls And Their Uses
This heading at once brings us face to face with the important query: Shall our walls be considered and treated as Background or as Decoration? and, after all, the question should not be difficult for...
-Papered Walls
In general, walls in the whites, neutrals, and soft, light shades of colour will be found the most practical. The reasons have before been given but may be repeated here: 1. Through them we are able ...
-Panels, Friezes, Dados And Canopies
These have all had their special vogue and, as is always the case with crazes, have afterwards been discredited - and probably will again be revived with equal fervour. Each has its own uses and may...
-Ceilings
As the walls should be lighter than the floors, the ceilings should be lighter than the walls, but of the same colour, they being properly an extension of them. If the walls are of two tones, such as ...
-Borders And Picture Bails
It is accepted without question by many persons that borders are a decorative necessity. So far is this from being the case that one should carefully consider whether they are needed before using them...
-Woodwork Or "Trim"
The trim of windows and doors (and the doors themselves) with which most of us have to do are of wood, or in strictly fireproof buildings of metal. Stone or brick are, of course, also frequently used ...
-Pleasing Finishes
Paint, enamel, mahogany and dark oak, real or stained, and many other woods less usually employed, are all good. The first two may be either in white or in tint. Great stress is laid by some upon the ...
-"The Whites" For Wall Use
There is a theory abroad that white walls contrast too strongly with the furnishings of a room; and mahogany furniture used with their extreme form of white, calcimine walls, has been pronounced impo...
-Wall Treatment In The Newer Decoration
As has been said in Part I, Chapter IX (Nineteenth Century Episodes And After), simplicity and right organisation are prominent tenets of the newer school, and it is recognised that the correct handli...
-The Avoidance Of The Usual
Many devices for this purpose are used by the newer school of decoration. One of the most prominent of them is the painting of the woodwork (the trim) a different shade from the walls, lighter or da...
-Chapter IV. Floors And Their Coverings
THE usual theory regarding floors is that they are a portion of the background of the room, the other two portions being walls and ceiling. This is quite true, but floors are more than this - they are...
-The Floor As A Background Or As Decoration
In the chapter on walls it was said that they might either be treated as background or as decoration. The same is often true of floors and with them we are sometimes still more free to choose which me...
-The Floor As Decoration - Highly Patterned Rugs
Oriental rugs,* which first demand attention, have been subjected to alternate laudation and detraction: let us give them unprejudiced consideration. There are some bad and cheap modern Oriental rugs...
-Structural Floors
The regarding of the floor as Foundation will be found particularly appropriate when we consider such Structural Floors as light-coloured tile (Plate 81B), white marble, mosaic and cement, all of whic...
-Chapter V. Windows And Their Treatment
Retaining Purpose And Enhancing Decorative Value. Length And Arrangement Of Curtains. Valances. Materials And Employment. Coloured Sash Curtains. Overcurtains. Unhackneyed Effects. Fixtures. Door-Hang...
-The Length And Arrangement Of Curtains
The architecture of the window naturally plays an important part in the determination of curtain treatment. Where the wall beneath the window is recessed as well as is the window itself, the obvious s...
-Valances
Valances are not only a strong decorative asset but often seem required as a finish: it appears rather illogical, for instance, that coloured draperies should hang at the sides of a window without the...
-Curtain Materials And Their Employment
In the reaction from the elaborate and costly creations of lace which were the pride of our mothers, the frequent present prescription of absolutely plain material for thin curtains goes, perhaps, too...
-Over-Curtains
The moment that definite colour, and especially patterned colour, is introduced in window hangings they become a vital part of the decoration of the room and need special consideration. The windows ar...
-Exceptional, And Unhackneyed Effects with Curtains
Sometimes a window is the one distinguished feature in an otherwise difficult room and it then seems advisable to play up this interest in order to redeem it from the commonplace. Close consideratio...
-Fixtures
Except for use with extremely large and weighty curtains the bulky wooden pole - from which it seems so difficult to divorce the general public - is unnecessary and therefore objectionable. Those inte...
-Door-Hangings
Circumstances vary so greatly that it is unwise to give hard and fast rules, but in general it may be said that if over-curtains are used at windows it is advisable that at doorways (the corresponding...
-Chapter VI. The Arrangement And Balance Of Furniture
THE arrangement of furniture is taken up before the subject of furniture itself, because most persons are already possessed of at least a portion of what is to be used. Furthermore, the matter of arra...
-Objects Of Central Interest
Every large wall space should have an object of central interest about which other objects may group, and if it be not there we must either supply or create it. It may be supplied by one of the larger...
-Fireplaces
We have the expression Hearth and Home, and when there is a fireplace, it is the central object of interest and should be so treated. In many old houses, a 19. settle often stood endwise to the room...
-Double And Minor Centres Of Interest
In a great salon, one central object (even with minor ones) on a long unbroken wall space would probably not be sufficient. In such a case two large and handsome companion cabinets could be used. They...
-Corners
Corners are usually a consolation and convenience rather than a source of worry (Plate 89 A). Frequently pieces on the side wall are close enough to the corner sufficiently to occupy it, while the oth...
-The Setting Of Furniture Out Into The Room
We have just looked over a series of interiors of modern club-houses and handsome dwellings and the first expression occurring thereat was decidedly unlit-erary. It seems to be a weakness of human nat...
-Scale And Proportion
The importance of considering the relative sizes of various accompanying objects (the relation is technically called scale) runs throughout the subject of interior decoration and must everywhere be ta...
-Experimentation. Interior Decoration Is Not A Mystery
It Is the use of enlightened common sense. Experience leads us to the conviction that even those who are unskilled in home arrangement have more intrinsic ability in this direction than they realise, ...
-Chapter VII. Furniture And Its Choosing
IN the first chapter of this Part, The Basis of Successful Decoration, we have strongly advocated the use of Period Furniture when and where it may be had. The facilities at hand for the purchase of...
-Wicker Furniture
The making of furniture in willow, reed, rattan, cane and bamboo (the term wicker seems commonly used for all of them) is one of the most serviceable and useful of modern mobiliary developments. These...
-Period Furniture
There remains the long and noble line of Period Furniture. In considering it a certain amount of knowledge must be taken for granted by the writers. Those not familiar with the subject are referred to...
-Selecting Furniture According To Qualities Of Meaning
In considering Period Furniture, as indeed with the whole subject of decoration, let us appeal for a broader and more catholic spirit than is often found. Just why the sympathies and appreciation of m...
-Antiques And Reproductions
In all the large cities there are dealers in imported antiques. These pieces are usually choice and necessarily high in price, but those who can afford them will find these dealers reliable and fully ...
-Commercial Period Furniture
There are many large factories throughout the country, with superb equipment, turning out quantities of furniture of excellent workmanship, mostly by machinery. This furniture is found in good furnitu...
-Suites And Odd Pieces
The idea that a room must be furnished exclusively with one suite of furniture is happily defunct; and yet, like most such popular conceptions, it contains a certain amount of validity; the errour lyi...
-Furniture For The "Modern Decoration"
There is no doubt that of recent years, in the revival of interest in good furnishing, great attention has been given to furniture and sometimes expense has been lavished upon it not out of proportion...
-Chapter VIII. Decorative Textiles
THE decorative importance of textiles can scarcely be overestimated because it is largely by their use that effect and colour are gained, and if the opportunity is missed here it is often altogether m...
-Fabrics For "Modern" Decoration
While the new decoration is not absolutely confined to the simpler materials, its tendencies are in that direction and the fabrics chosen are usually therefore such as linens, casement-cloth, sunfas...
-Wall Hangings
To anyone looking through the illustrations of this volume the decorative value of wall-hangings must be apparent. Tapestries and rich brocades, needlework and embroidered silks and velvets, Oriental ...
-Movement
Design may be balanced and static or it may have movement; i.e., its lines of construction may be so strong in a certain direction that the vision is pulled along their course. If the repose of a room...
-Texture
Texture is the arrangement or disposition of the material composing a substance and results in that substance having such qualities as heaviness and lightness, smoothness or roughness, fineness or coa...
-Hints On Purchasing
A covering being needed for a new screen and it naturally being of importance in the decoration of the room the man of the house stopped in the decorator's shop at which he dealt and out of a large st...
-Chapter IX. Artificial Lighting
ARTIFICIAL lighting is an exceedingly important subject, and yet, in many households, it seems to be ignored in inverse ratio to its importance, of course with deplorable consequences. The whole subj...
-Artificial Lighting. Continued
It is well both to group candles at certain points and also to use them singly or in pairs symmetrically placed. The objections to candle lighting usually come either from those that have never really...
-Candlesticks And Candles
In addition to their obvious usefulness candlesticks are a strong decorative asset. The soft glint of metal or the beauty of colour in pottery or decorated surface which they supply would be severely ...
-Lamps
Said the innocent small-householder I have just spent $60.00 for a new chandelier. And when we groaned: Why a chandelier? his injured surprise was as great as if he had been asked, Why a breakfa...
-Lamps Of Many Varieties
The description and picturing of museum pieces would be of little value to the average householder. Par better will be some treatment of such lamps as are not absolutely prohibitive in price, together...
-Pedestal Lamps
The best of the pedestal lamps are naturally those of faithful period styles because they are the best designed, but there is nevertheless an almost bewildering array of attractive things of modern or...
-Candelabra, Torcheres And Standard Lights
Candelabra and other standard lights have always played-an important part in interior furnishing and they are of equal use today. They are especially appropriate with floors of marble, mosaic and tile...
-Chapter X. Mantel Decoration And Garniture
THE mantel began as architecture and ended, in its final development, as furniture. This is unqualifiedly true, so far as the historic styles of decoration, with which we have to do, are concerned. In...
-Mantel Decoration And Garniture. Continued
(3) Propriety of Scale means that the size of the objects composing the garniture must be of a scale to accord with the whole mantel and overmantel composition - neither too large nor too small. In ot...
-Chapter XI. Pictures And Their Framing
Pictures A VOLUME could not contain all the advice that might be offered upon this subject: the present chapter must be concise, but we shall endeavour to make it helpful. Number And Character Firs...
-Colour Prints And Monotints
Colour prints are among the most delightful things at one's command. The original eighteenth century French and English prints are now almost priceless, but there are excellent reproductions at fair f...
-Picture Framing
Generally speaking, there are two differing classes of frames - the wide and heavy ones naturally appropriate to the solid medium of oil-oolour and the lighter and slenderer mouldings used for water-c...
-Frames for Oil Paintings
The landscape or sea-piece should usually have a simpler frame than the ornamental figure subject; oftentimes the simpler it is the better. Yet it is difficult to formulate rules where each picture ha...
-The Framing Of Water-Colours, Drawings And Paints
Glass must necessarily be used for the protection of all pictures painted or printed upon paper. In general their frames, whether of gold or of wood, should be slender, or of but moderate width, unob...
-Framed Photographs
Framed photographs are in general much better stood upon tables, low bookcases, and such places, than hung upon the wall, and many attractive standing frames are now procurable. One or two portraits o...
-Mats And Mounts
The use of these seems greatly to have disturbed some minds. The simple truth is that many pictures of all types other than oils look well either with mats (of not too great contrast) or without them,...
-The Hanging Of Pictures
The principles of placing pictures on the wall are, of course, those of balance generally. The natural height is usually that of the eye or but little above; but, as there is nearly always some piece ...
-Chapter XII. Decorative Accessories
IT has been observed that in dress a man or woman may be known by shoes, hats and gloves. In the same degree in which this is true, the taste, and to some extent the character, of the occupants of a h...
-Part III. International-Inter Period Decoration
Beautiful things have dignity. Enjoy the rhythm of your dancing and admire the beauty of your bookbinding. In whatever you do, have an ideal of excellence. Any separation between art and work is not o...
-Chapter I. The Renaissance
What The Renaissance Was IN taking up this first influence we may, very practically, ask: How did it manifest itself in the arts - in short, what was it? The popular superstition is that when the gr...
-The Renaissance. Continued
Exterior And Interior In considering the use of the more ornamental backgrounds a question at once arises. As will now have been seen, great differences existed in the treatment of the interiors of t...
-The Association Of Furniture Of Various Nationalities
In Plate 89 is a grouping of an excellent Italian cabinet flanked by two Italian chairs of the most rigidly formal type, with runner beneath the feet, and properly upholstered in velvet with gold galo...
-Characteristics Of The Renaissance
The adaptability of Renaissance furnishing to our uses today may be gathered from its main characteristics. Perhaps its most outstanding qualities axe spaciousness, dignity, formality and richness. It...
-Chapter II. The Baroque Seventeenth Century. The Romantic Spirit
NOT yet does it seem to be understood by many that the spirit which is contrary to the Classic in interior decoration is the same which opposes it in the other arts: consequently we hear much of Baroq...
-Architectural Background
Typical illustrations are given of interiors of the various nations under Baroque influence. So vastly do the characteristics of the fixed background of England differ from the others, and such an int...
-The Association Of Furniture Of Various Periods
A varied selection of the furniture evolved in the various countries under Baroque influence is given in these pages and will be discussed in relation to their practical use in our present-day interio...
-The Furniture Of The Baroque Epoch And Its Employment
A volume would be required to describe and picture all the types of furniture of the Baroque age, bound up as it is with the political and religious history of the times and the action and reaction of...
-The Furniture Of The Baroque Epoch And Its Employment. Continued
We may now take up types of Baroque furniture which do not properly accompany Renaissance forms. The Armoire (Plate 141 A) is illustrated to show the work of Boulle, the most famous ebeniste of all t...
-Chapter III. The Rococo. The Baroque And The Rococo
SOME usually careful writers refer to Baroque and Rococo almost as if the terms were interchangeable. Both are the fruit of the great Romantic impulse, and the latter is directly successive to the for...
-The Age And The Style of Louis XV
The Grand Monarch had at last departed this life. His rule had been long and it was his great grandson, Louis XV, the Well Beloved, who succeeded him. The Duke of Orleans acted as Regent during the ...
-Simplified Backgrounds
Notwithstandinng the disparities of style in the period of Louis XIV, exterior architecture had reached under J. H. Mansart, the king's architect, a Classic dignity which in exterior work was well pre...
-The Furniture Of The Rococo Period
In such a brief and necessarily inadequate review of epochs (each of which is a field for study) as can be given in the compass of a few chapters, it is plainly impossible to cover all phases or to il...
-The Practical Employment Of Rococo Furniture
If furniture of this period is to be used, an excellent degree of variety will be secured by supplementing French pieces by those of other nations under the same influence. In a preceding section it w...
-The Rococo Style And Present-Day Use
Admiration or dislike of this style is perhaps more than with any other a matter of temperament and personal character. In reaching a decision we should not fail to discriminate - one may grow very im...
-Chapter IV. The Neo-Classic
The Classic Revival THE cause of the Classic Revival has been much discussed but after all is extremely simple. The Romantic spirit, as expressed in the Baroque and Rococo movements, had done its utm...
-The French Spirit
As no decoration or furniture can be understood without a right understanding of the circumstances that gave them rise, it is necessary to say a few words regarding the supposed influence of Marie Ant...
-The Furniture Of The Neo-Classic Period
Searching the language for the one descriptive word best applying to the furniture of the eighteenth century it would probably be found in delightful. We all know how rhythmic in line and homelike in ...
-The Assembling Of Neo-Classic Furniture
As the principles of selection have been dealt with in previous chapters few remarks are necessary regarding the assembling of furniture of this epoch. With ordinary care in choice and placing most of...
-The Neo-Classic Backgrounds And Furniture
In addition to the Adam room containing a variety of furniture, two particularly interesting interiors are given to show the close correspondence in spirit existing between the various nationalities. ...
-The Directory, Consulate And Empire In The Neo-Classic Epoch
The period covered by these governments of France is a portion of the Neo-Classic epoch, but the manifestations of the Empire style were so different from those of the reign of Louis XVI that for the ...
-The Four Great Decorative Influences Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classic
Dates given are approximate, and are those of the first clear manifestations. Symptoms always showed themselves earlier. Influences persisted till the advent of the succeeding movement, often blending...







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