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A Manual Of The Hand Lathe



I did not write this little book with the intention of apologizing to the prospective reader, so soon as I had done so, but with the honest, I hope not egotistical, feeling that I had something to say that was not generally known. We live to learn and to impart what we know to others, and I have taken this method of giving my experience in a pastime that is elevating, artistic in every sense of the word, and a wholesome relief from the cares of business.

TitleA Manual Of The Hand Lathe
AuthorEgbert P. Watson
PublisherHenry Carey Baird
Year1869
Copyright1869, Egbert P. Watson
AmazonA manual of the hand lathe: Comprising concise directions for working metals of all kinds, ivory, bone and precious woods; dyeing, coloring, and French ... work with dispatch, and at small expense

A Manual Of The Hand Lathe:

Comprising Concise Directions Fob Working Metals Of All Kinds, Ivory, Bone And Precious Woods; Dyeing, Coloring, And French Polishing; Inlaying By Veneers, And Various Methods Practiced To Produce Elaborate Work With Dispatch, And At Small Expense.

By Egbert P. Watson,

Late Of "The Scientific American," Author Of "The Modern Practice Of American Machinists And Engineers."

Illustrated By Seventy-Eight Engravings.

Philadelphia:

Henry Carey Baird, Industrial Publisher,

406 Walnut Street.

London:

Sampson Low, Son & Marston,

Crown Buildings, 188 Fleet St.

1869.

Entered according to Act of Congress, In the year 1869, by Henry Carey Baird, 111 the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, in and for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

To My Dear Son, Egbert Perley Watson, I Dedicate This Little Book, In The Hope That He May Be A Good Man, And A Good Mechanic.

-Preface
I did not write this little book with the intention of apologizing to the prospective reader, so soon as I had done so, but with the honest, I hope not egotistical, feeling that I had something to say...
-Chapter I. The Foot Lathe
There are two distinct kinds of work done in foot lathes - the useful and the merely ornamental. Both afford enjoyment and profit to those who practise them. The mechanic who earns his living by worki...
-Chapter II. Tools
Any one who has watched a novice at work on a lathe, must have remarked the difficulty he has in controlling the tool and keeping up the motion of the treadle at the same time. The two operations are ...
-Chapter III. Scrapers, Etc
To suit different kinds of work, as previously stated, various tools are needed, but the reader must not expect to see them all illustrated in this book. The workman will learn what tools he needs, an...
-Chasing And Screw Cutting
In an engine, or power lathe, all screws are cut by trains of gears, as mechanics well know, but in the hand lathe, which was the first machine, screws, both male and female, must be made by chasers o...
-Chapter IV. Chasers, Etc
It is not always an easy task to chase a true thread on a piece of work, and even the boldest holds his breath for a time, if he has a nice piece of work all done but the thread, and that in a criti...
-Chapter V. Chucking
Chucking work in the lathe is one of the most interesting branches, for here there are no centers in the way, to plague the workman, and the tool has a fair sweep at all parts. Every one who uses a la...
-Chapter VI. Metal Spinning
Spinning sheet metal into various forms is another kind of work which can be done in the foot lathe, and it is here that the amateur can show his taste and dexterity. The process consists in formin...
-Chapter VII. Ornamental Cutting
I SHALL now give some examples of turning different things which are useful and interesting to work. These are only hints, and I make no claim to discovery, or to anything specially novel or ingenious...
-To Make A Pair Of Solitaire Sleeve Buttons
- Solitaire buttons are those which have so lately come in fashion; that is, a single stud with two eyes on the back for the button-holes of the wristband. It is easier to make one stud on the back of...
-Chapter VIII. Centers
An indispensable article on a foot lathe, where any fancy work is to be done, is the centers - of which I have before spoken - shown in Fig. 46. These consist of a common set of heads, with spindles f...
-Chapter IX. Fancy Turning
Fig. 51 is another, a little more ornate and of a different pattern. The process is essentially the same, except that there are no spurs and a solid disk is left inside. This disk is turned out of ...
-Chapter X. Ornamental Woods
In the matter of wood working, the amateur has a field as wide and attractive as the most enthusiastic could wish. Of course, under this head only those that are ornamental are considered, leaving the...
-Chapter XI. Wood Turning
In turning wood, the speed cannot be too high, or the tool too sharp. The faster the speed, the more perfect the surface produced by the tool. In centering, also, it is necessary to use care in gettin...
-Chapter XII. Tools For Wood Turning
It does not seem necessary to go into the discussion of tools, or shapes of tools, for wood turning, for the grand and great reliance for roughing is the gouge, and a skillful workman will do as many ...
-Chapter XIII. Tool Tempering, Etc
The great object is to harden at as low a heat as possible, so as not to injure the steel. The tool must not be treated as a blacksmith does iron, nothing like so hot, but so as to be of a dull cherry...
-Chapter XIV. Artistic Wood Turning
Some of the most beautiful work, really artistic in every sense of the word, is made by laying up woods of different colors, but of the same general character as regards hardness. If this latter preca...
-Chapter XV. Stamp Inlaying
Of course there are times and places where the sameness and rigidity of angular patterns are tedious, and the eye and hand, fatigued by it, desire a change into something more graceful and harmonious ...
-Chapter XVI. Designs In Mosaic
These methods greatly expedite the labor of inlaying, for mere labor much of it is; that is, when repetition of the pattern is frequent, as it is in small designs. The great trouble and vice of ama...
-Chapter XVII. Finishing The Outside
When the pattern has all been laid, the next thing that remains is to finish the exterior, and polish it or oil it as may be desired. To do this it is, of course, necessary to use great care. The vene...
-Chapter XVIII. Inlaying Continued
A very convenient tool for inlaying veneers edgewise, so as to produce alternate dark and white lines is made by taking a piece of steel, one fourth of an inch by one sixteenth thick, and making a chi...
-Gluing In Veneers
In a previous part of this little work I have advised the use of waterproof cements for fine inlaying, so that dampness will not affect them, but as this is not always convenient, it is well to make t...
-Ivory
This substance is certainly a most attractive one to the turner. Pure in color, hard, solid and strong beyond belief in texture or grain, it has the fewest disadvantages of any substance we use. It is...
-Dyeing Ivory
I tried a great many plans and recipes for dyeing ivory before I hit upon any that were in all respects satisfactory. Most of them were nasty, involved the purchase of drugs and dyes that were sure to...
-Chapter XIX. Ornamental Designs For Inlaying
Although a handsomely veined piece of wood is as beautiful a thing as any one would wish to see, there are occasionally pieces of work that look well inlaid, and for this it is desirable that we shoul...
-Chapter XX. General Summary
In polishing metals, whether brass, iron, steel, or of whatever nature, it is essential that the tool marks and scratches of files, or other agents, should be entirely removed before the final gloss i...
-Lacquers
2 gals. Alcohol, proof, specific gravity Dot less than 95 per. cent. 1 lb. Seed-lac. 1 oz. Gum Copal. 1 oz. English Saffron. 1 oz. Annotto. Another. 40 ozs. Proof Alcohol. 8 grs. Spanis...
-Soldering
There are many ways of soldering, but the amateur will find the spirit lamp and the soldering iron the most convenient and expeditious. In soldering tinned surfaces, no particular care is needed, a...
-Varnishing And Polishing
On no account is a second coat of varnish to be applied before the first one is dry. If this is done the result will be a sticky, ridgy, dirty looking job. Before the work is varnished even, it must b...
-Brushes,
In varnishing, you, of course, desire to have a true and even surface, without a ridge to show where the brush left it. Camel's hair flat brushes are used for this purpose, but they will not answer in...
-Pearl
This substance is easily sawed into shape, and is easily turned with a common steel tool. It is polished readily with pumice stone and water and putty powder, this last to be had of chemists or lap...
-Miscellaneous Tools
If you buy any tools, always buy the best that money can get. P. S. Stubs' files, wire, rimmers, and screw plates, are standard tools, and the amateur cannot go astray in choosing them. A vise is i...
-Curving Maple Veneers
If you wish to curve a veneer so that it will fit a half or a whole circle, it is easily done by dipping it in hot water, when it will instantly curl up into any shape you want. I do this with bird's ...
-Cutting Miscellaneous Materials
By these I mean horn jet, malachite, alabaster, cannel coal, glass, and similar substances. For all of these, except malachite, steel will answer, but that steel will not touch. It is not a nice mater...







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previous page: Carpentry | by Ira Samuel Griffith
  
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