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It is necessary to protect transplantings from the sun until they have taken root and are able to stand the

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Figs. 604 to 606. - Three Methods of Shielding Transplantings until they have Taken Root.

heat without wilting, and for early Spring transplanting before the season has become far enough advanced to make frost an impossibility, it is necessary to provide frost protection. The protectors shown upon the following pages have proved practical for these purposes, and you will find them easy to make.

The Paper-Funnel Shield shown in Fig. 604 is so rolled that one side, left open, can be turned away from the sun to admit light and air. Make the funnels out of pieces of heavy wrapping-paper.

The Flower-Pot Shield (Fig. 605) is commonly used for short plants, because flower-pots are almost always at hand.

The Basket Shield shown in Fig. 606 is a good type of sun shield because, while it gives protection, it admits lots of light and air. Of the three shields, the paper-funnel shield is the one to use if you have a great many trans-plantings to protect.

The Tin Can Shield and Forcer shown in Fig. 607 is useful not only to protect transplantings from frost and the sun, but also as a small cold-frame to force a plant's growth in the early Spring while the weather is yet cool. The sun's rays passing through the glass top of the forcer will carry heat to the plant in the same way that heat is carried to the plants in the cold-frame.

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Fig. 607. - Tin Can Shield and Forcer

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Figs. 608 to 609. - Tin Can Shield and Forcer in Use

Tomato cans are of the best size for the tin can forcer, and 4-by-5 inch camera plates are of the right size for the glass tops. If you cannot get used camera plates, any broken pieces of glass that you can find will do. If the can ends are crimped on, as most cans are now made, cut the ends open with a can opener. Punch a nail-hole in opposite sides of the can near one end, place the glass on the can, pass a a piece of wire over it, and stick the wire ends through the holes; twist the wire ends as shown in Fig. 607, and the wire will hold the glass in place. Nail the side of the can to a stake whittled to a point on its lower end.

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Fig. 610. - A Plant Forcer

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Fig. 611. - Cross-Section of Plant Forcer Fig. 612. - Patterns of Pieces Required

Figure 608 shows the forcer set close to the ground; Fig. 609 shows it raised for ventilation When the nights are cold, spread heavy paper over the plant, then set the can down over this, for extra protection When the weather warms up, and you wish to shield the plant from the sun, slip a piece of paper under the glass top

The Plant Forcer in Fig. 610 requires more time to make than the tin-can forcer. It has the advantage of being roomier. The size of glass you obtain will determine the size of the parts. In the model shown, I used a 6 1/2-by-8 1/2-inch camera plate, and the dimensions on the pattern of Fig. 612 are correct for glass of this size. Go to a paint shop and see what you can get in small pieces of glass. Possibly you can get scraps that will not cost much.

The cross-section (Fig. 611) shows how the pieces go together. Prepare end pieces A and front and back strips B by the patterns (Fig. 612), and nail them together. Then cut back piece C to fit, and nail it to end pieces A. The glass rests upon front strip B, and it is held in place by four nails (E), driven into the edges of the end pieces A so the heads overlap the glass. The screw-eye F in the top edge of piece C helps hold the glass in place.

When you have completed the forcer, give it a coat of paint. Green is the best color for garden accessories, but if you have another color on hand, make it do.