1 - Plane one side smooth and mark "I." Call this side the "working face." Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. Holding Wood Between Bench Pegs and Planing Surface.

Fig. 1. Holding Wood Between Bench Pegs and Planing Surface.

Fig. 2. Edge Planing.

Fig. 2. Edge Planing.

2 - Plane one adjoining edge at right angles to surface "I" and mark "II." Call this edge the working edge. Fig. 2.

3 - Draw a line across surface "I" near one end at right angles to surface "II," and remove the end stock to line with saw or plane. Mark end surface "III." Call this end the working end. Fig. 3, Fig. 4.

Fig. 3. Squaring the End with Try Square and Pencil.

Fig. 3. Squaring the End with Try Square and Pencil.

4 - Measure off the length of the required piece on surface "I" from the end surface "III," and reduce stock to length with saw or plane. Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. Sawing Cross Grain on Bench Hook with Back or Handy Saw.

Fig. 4. Sawing Cross Grain on Bench Hook with Back or Handy Saw.

Fig. 4a. End Planing with a Block Plane.

Fig. 4a. End Planing with a Block Plane.

4a - The end may be trimmed with a block plane as shown. Fig. 4a.

5 - Measure off the width of the required piece on surface "I" from edge "II" and remove stock to line with plane.

6 - With marking gauge set at the thickness of the required piece, measure off the thickness of the required stock from surface "I" and remove stock to line with plane. Fig. 5.

Fig. 5. The Marking Gauge in Use.

Fig. 5. The Marking Gauge in Use.

Fig. 6. Testing to See if End is Square with the Edge.

Fig. 6. Testing to See if End is Square with the Edge.

6 - In reducing a piece of wood to dimensions the try square should be used constantly, to obtain right angles with the adjoining surfaces. The stock should be removed to the line but the line should never be cut away. Fig. 6.