Decimal.

oz.

dr.

.78

1

1.56

2

2.34

3

3.12

4

3.91

5

4.69

6

5.47

7

6.25

1

0

7.03

1

1

7.81

1

2

8.59

1

3

9.87

1

4

10.16

1

5

10.94

1

6

11.72

1

7

12.50

2

0

Decimal.

or.

dr.

13.28

2

1

14.06

2

2

14.84

2

3

15.62

2

4

16.41

2

5

17.19

2

6

17.97

2

7

18.75

3

0

19.53

3

1

20.31

3

2

21.09

3

3

21.87

3

4

22.66

3

5

23.44

3

6

24.22

3

7

25.00

4

0

Decimal.

oz.

dr.

25.78

4

1

26.56

4

2

27.34

4

3

28.12

4

4

28.91

4

5

29.69

4

6

30.47

4

7

31.25

5

0

32.03

5

1

3281

5

2

33.59

5

3

34.37

5

4

35.16

5

5

35.94

5

6

36.50

5

7

87.50

.6

0

Decimal.

oz.

dr.

38.28

6

1

39.06

6

2

39.84

6

3

40.62

6

4

41.41

6

5

4219

6

6

42.97

6

7

43.75

7

0

44.53

7

1

45.31

7

2

46.09

7

3

46.87

7

4

47.66

7

5

48.44

7

6

49.22

7

7

50.00

8

0

Application of the Table. The Chinese Packfong, similar to our German silver, according to Dr. Fyfe's analysis, p. 279, is said to consist of -

40.4 part* of Copper

equivalent to

6

oz..

4 drama, nearly.

25.4

- Zinc

4

-

0

- full.

21.6

- Nickel '

5

-

1

- nearly.

2.61

- Iron

0

-

3

- full.

100.0

Parts

10

oz.

0

- Avoirdupois.

All nice attempts at proportion, are however entirely futile, unless the metals are perfectly pure; for example, it is a matter of common observation that for speculums, a variable quantity of from seven and a half to eight and a half ounces of tin is required for the exact saturation of every pound of copper, and upon which saturation the efficiency of the compound depends; bells of exactly similar quality sometimes thus require the dose of tin to vary from three and a half to five ounces, to the pound of copper, according to the qualities of the metals.

The variations in the purity of the metals obtained from different localities, are abundantly demonstrated by the disagreement in the cohesive strengths of the two in question, more particularly the tin, as seen on page 297, and which can be only ascribed to their respective amounts of impurity. Any other supposition than the presence of foreign matter, would necessarily go to disprove the fact of the metals being simple bodies, and therefore strictly alike when absolutely pure, wheresoever they may have been obtained.