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About Dreaming, Laughing And Blushing | by Arthur Mitchell



In ordinary circumstances we are made aware of the existence of such things as chairs and tables through the sense of sight; but chairs and tables may, in certain conditions, be accepted by the mind as existing where they have no existence. They do not, in that case, reach the mind through the eye. They may be said to be seen directly by the mind itself without being imaged on the retina. The eye plays no part in this kind of vision. The mind, in other words, may be said, in certain conditions, to see without the aid of the eye. But the things so seen have no reality...

TitleAbout Dreaming, Laughing And Blushing
AuthorArthur Mitchell
PublisherWilliam Green And Sons
Year1905
Copyright1905, William Green And Sons
AmazonAbout Dreaming, Laughing And Blushing

By Sir Arthur Mitchell, K.C.B.

Dedicated To Dr. Joseph Bell, A Trusted Friend Of Many Years

About Dreaming, Laughing And Blushing
-Preface
No preface to this little book is really needed. I have written it in order to say some things which I wished to say. The opinions I hold I have stated as clearly as I could, and I have endeavoured to...
-Dreaming
(l) In ordinary circumstances we are made aware of the existence of such things as chairs and tables through the sense of sight; but chairs and tables may, in certain conditions, be accepted by the mi...
-Dreaming. Part 2
Hippocrates, Leibnitz, and Abercrombie have also been quoted as holding that there is no dreamless sleep, and so far as they express themselves on the subject they appear to do so. Elliotson regards ...
-Dreaming. Part 3
Of course all the unceasing work of the brain tends to wear it out, and does wear it out; but this wearing out is not the result of any one part of its unceasing work. The thinking part of its work, i...
-Dreaming. Part 4
Refreshment of course also comes to the Will from the repose, during steep, of the muscles, which it has so constantly to call into action in those who are awake. Darwin says that it is the 'part of ...
-Dreaming. Part 5
Such phrases as 'dropping sleep-ward,' 'dropping off to sleep,' 'dropping into a slumberous state of mind,' represent fact or experience. (20) A point of great importance is that during these brief p...
-Dreaming. Part 6
Others have been as clear and as emphatic on this point as Miss Cobbe. Elliotson, for instance, says that in dreams 'we perform the most ruthless crimes without compunction, and see what in our waking...
-Dreaming. Part 7
There is in dreams a very imperfect memory of waking life. Nearly as imperfect is the memory of dream life in those who are awake. It may happen, however, that in sleep a memory may come up of an occu...
-Dreaming. Part 8
I do not know of any case in which taste or touch, and only of one case in which smell was completely absent; but the cases are numerous in which sight or hearing was absent, either from birth or from...
-Dreaming. Part 9
(36) Miss Sullivan says, in her letter to me, that Miss Keller, in a book which she is about to publish, will give extracts from a College 'theme ' which she wrote about her dreams. She regards her pu...
-Dreaming. Part 10
(39) Professor Jastrow also discusses the case of Laura Bridgman, and he is aided in this by an unpublished manuscript on the subject by Dr. G. S. Stanley, which came into his possession, In this acco...
-Laughing
(1) The physical phenomena of laughter are not easily described, chiefly for the reasons that there is so much tumult in them, and that they are so widespread. It is not necessary, however, for my pur...
-Laughing. Part 2
(5) Then I advance a step and say, that if it would be correct to say this in regard to a fit of laughter which had lasted for a considerable time, it follows that it would also be correct to say it i...
-Laughing. Part 3
(14) This at any rate seems certain - they are not in either case the product of disease, as we use the word. There is nothing pathological about them. They are physiological in their nature. But they...
-Laughing. Part 4
But man has a much less exclusive possession of laughter than he has of blushing. Indeed, of all the expressions of emotion or feeling, blushing, I think, has been correctly described as the most stri...
-Laughing. Part 5
There is another point worthy of notice. The dog licks his feet without causing the jerk, though in the lick some of the touching must be light and the seeming equivalent of tickling. It appears as if...
-Laughing. Part 6
Professor Wyllie tells me that he thinks the laughter of the negro very characteristic, and another good observer tells me that there arc twenty of his friends and more with a special laughter which h...
-Laughing. Part 7
It is scarcely possible, indeed, to imagine a great joy expressing itself in audible laughter, or even in the unvoiced smile. Indeed, we naturally think of great joy as silent. Even the pleasant gladd...
-Laughing. Part 8
Emerson is always gentle in dealing with human frailties, and it is nice to find him thus apologising for the laughter of the crowd at the man in pursuit of his blown-off hat: 'To sec a man in a high ...
-Laughing. Part 9
(44) It has been alleged that laughter is rarely good on the stage - in other words, that it is difficult to imitate laughter or to laugh voluntarily with success. It scarcely needs to be pointed out...
-Laughing. Part 10
The ridiculous and the humorous are very seldom suggested by the senses of smell and taste. But these senses figure largely in the delusions of the insane, and often painfully - disagreeable odours s...
-Laughing. Part 11
1 frequently saw James Mitchell when he was a grown man. I have seen him smile very often, and his smile was pleasant and in all respects like the smile of persons who could see and hear. Sometimes it...
-Laughing. Part 12
(50) All the persons of whom I have been just speaking were entirely deprived both of sight and hearing, either from birth or from quite early infancy, but they all had good intellectual powers. Ludic...
-Laughing. Part 13
1 The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Dary, Barf. Edited by his Brother. Vol. iii. London, 8vo. 1839. (54) Many distinguished persons breathed the gas at Davy's wish, and recorded their experiences fo...
-Laughing. Part 14
(61) Davy pointed out the possible value of the gas as an anaesthetic in minor surgical operations, and now, long years after he did so, it has come into constant use for that purpose, particularly in...
-Laughing. Part 15
(73) It is not easy to understand how a listener, before the days of shorthand writing, could so fully retail these orations from memory. He professes even to have preserved the different styles of th...
-Blushing
(1) The state of the mind during a blush, described broadly, is one of confusion, and this is often strongly marked. 'Covered with confusion,' indeed, is a way of describing persons who are in the act...
-Blushing. Part 2
(3) A relaxation of the muscular coats of the small arteries by which the capillaries become filled with blood, implying that the proper vasomotor centre is affected, is said by Darwin to be the expla...
-Blushing. Part 3
The division of blushes into the true blush, the false blush, the blush of modesty or bashfulness, the blush from morbid sensibility, the deceptive blush, and the blush of conscience, serves no useful...
-Blushing. Part 4
(6) The shyness, which is spoken of in relation to blushing, has nothing to do with fear, though the word, as otherwise used, may be regarded as having fear within its meaning. Both fear and cowardice...
-Blushing. Part 5
(9) Generally only the face, cars, and neck redden, but it is nevertheless correct to say that the whole body may be affected, and there may be tingling, or some peculiar sensation, almost everywhere....
-Blushing. Part 6
This phenomenon is correctly enough called involuntary, though that quality can scarcely be ascribed to any vital process, in regard to which it may not be shown that the will in certain circumstances...
-Blushing. Part 7
So long as speculations of this nature have their character fully acknowledged, and so long as they are not quite idle, they may have a useful outcome. They at least direct attention to what merits co...
-Blushing. Part 8
Hybrids, mulattos, or crosses between blacks and whites, are well known to blush as freely and fully as pure whites. And there is no question as to the blush appearing in brown and yellow races. It is...
-Blushing. Part 9
It is thus quite certain that this blind and deaf girl blushed, and also that she did so from the same causes as make those girls blush who both see and hear. She had only the sense of touch to make h...
-Blushing. Part 10
I consulted Sir Thomas R. Fraser and Sir T. Lauder Brunton in regard to the nitrite of amyl flush or blush, but they could not refer me to any writer who had made a special study of the mental state c...
-Postscript
These short essays were in type and ready for press before the publication of Laura Bridgrnan by Dr. Howe's two daughters, and in writing them I had no opportunity of consulting that very interesting ...
-List Of Some Books And Papers Relating To The Subject
1. Charles Darwin. Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals. 2nd ed. 8vo. London, 1901. 2. Thomas H. Burgess. Physiology of Blushing. 8vo. London, 1839. 3. James Sully. Essay on Laughter, etc. ...







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previous page: The Fabric Of Dreams: Dream Lore And Dream Interpretation, Ancient And Modern | by Katherine Taylor Craig
  
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next page: A History Of Dreams, Visions, Apparitions, Ecstasy, Magnetism, And Somnambulism | by A. Brierre De Boismont