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Sleep And Dreams | by John Murray



It is easy to spare books in these days of prolific authorship; and I fear it will hardly be considered a sufficient apology for my offering a superfluous book to the public, that I was impelled to do so by the request of partial friends. Yet I wish to say, that these Lectures, composed under many interruptions, were not designed for publication.

TitleSleep And Dreams
AuthorJohn Addington Symonds
PublisherJohn Murray
Year1851
Copyright1851, John Murray
AmazonSleep And Dreams: Two Lectures Delivered At The Bristol Literary And Philosophical Institution

Two Lectures Delivered At The Bristol Literary And Philosophical Institution.

By John Addington Symonds, M.D., Consulting Physician To The Bristol General Hospital.

To The Right Honorable Lord Teignmouth.

My dear Lord,

I venture to inscribe these Lectures to your Lordship, because the publication of them was requested in a resolution which you proposed to my audience, and to which, after it had been kindly seconded by Mr. Sutherland Graeme, and accepted by the meeting, I could not but feel myself bound in gratitude to accede. I am glad to have this public opportunity of expressing the deep respect and regard which I entertain towards your Lordship, and my admiration of the untiring activity with which you devote your high talents and attainments to the furtherance of the intellectual elevation, as well as of the moral and religious improvement of your fellow-creatures.

I remain, my dear Lord,

Your obliged and faithful Servant,

John Addington Symonds.

-Preface
It is easy to spare books in these days of prolific authorship; and I fear it will hardly be considered a sufficient apology for my offering a superfluous book to the public, that I was impelled to do...
-Lecture I. Sleep and Dreams
Objects of study may be arranged under two great divisions; one consisting of those which must be sought in a wide investigation of external nature; the other of such as are at all times, and in all p...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 2
The phenomena of sleep, as observed by a bystander, are, for the most part, these. The features are relaxed, and give little or no expression, unless of bodily pain or distress, or of the sentiments o...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 3
* The position of the limbs was illustrated by a series of admirable drawings, after the Old Masters, executed by Mr. Woods, and also by a beautiful original painting by Mr. Curnock. A limb a...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 4
From this account, then, it appears that when we sleep we not only lose the sensibility to external objects, and the power of volition, but also that ideas acquire such an increase of relative or abso...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 5
* De Rerun Natura, Lib. iv. * Dr. CARPENTER's General and Comparative Physiology, 156. We now return to the consideration of sleep in man. There are different degrees of sleep. It is more or...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 6
Sleep may not only become imperfect after having been complete, but it may also be so from the commencement, in consequence of unfavourable circumstances. Thus a person may fall asleep on horseback; b...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 7
Of this state I shall adduce two instances. The first is related by Professor Silliman, and quoted by Dr. PRichard. A lady of New England, of respectable family, became subject to paroxysms, which ca...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 8
From these and like considerations, we can better understand the phenomena of double consciousness. In this unusual state, the individual, though awake, perceives objects only in relation to the new p...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 9
The nearest approximation, then, towards an answer to our question is, perhaps, this; - that natural sleep is the result of exhausted action in certain portions of the nervous system; that time is req...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 10
And here I may remark, as a convenient place for the observation, that the brain, like the optic nerve, does not readily part with impressions of great vividness, so as to lapse into sleep; or if slee...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 11
Dull monotonous thoughts suggesting no lively images, no sallies of wit, no fancies fine, no manoeuvres of reasoning, should be encouraged by him who is anxious for sleep. Let him read or listen to...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 12
Not poppy, nor mandragora, Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep Which thon own'dat yesterday. Therefore, he who would sleep well should join in the pr...
-Sleep and Dreams. Part 13
In this merciful state, - perhaps a third part of an existence, - the prisoner may be for awhile set free, and the mourner no longer remember that he has cause to weep; the exile may visit the home an...
-Lecture II. The Nature of Dreaming
In our inquiry into the nature of Dreaming, the simplest, and, I think, the most philosophical course will be to ascertain, in the first instance, what the state of the mind in dreaming has in common ...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 2
Having made these prefatory observations, which to many present may have appeared too obvious and familiar for mention, but which I have introduced on the presumption that some of my younger hearers m...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 3
Reasoning operations may be conducted in sleep. Mathematicians have in their slumbers solved problems which posed them when awake. The great metaphysician, Con-dillao, was sometimes enabled in his sle...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 4
Before leaving the consideration of revived sensations, I may notice a peculiarity as to light and sound. We seldom, at least in healthy dreams, have visions of great brilliancy; the light is not that...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 5
The partial character of the thinking and feeling processes in sleep, is well illustrated by the defect of thai form of judgment which constitutes taste. The most miserable doggerel may then pass befo...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 6
Of the refreshment afforded by the arrangement which I have hinted at, we obtain perhaps a most decisive converse evidence from that kind of sleep which is not healthy; and which, like all morbid stat...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 7
The following extract illustrates the more distressing dreams produced by opium. The waters now changed their character; from translucent lakes, shining like mirrors, they now became seas and oceans...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 8
But these objections to the prophetic nature of dreams are only of a a priori formation. It may yet be a matter of fact that dreamers have been the subjects of supernatural illumination. But to admit ...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 9
In other dreams the communications made, though at first astounding, and all but supernatural, are easily referable to a principle which I noticed in the earlier part of this lecture, I mean the reviv...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 10
In this and similar cases the mind of the dreamer is placed passively in the very situation which we endeavour, but often in vain, to assume in our attempts at active recollection. All those associate...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 11
Plat in Phaedon. Apart from this view, there is nothing in dreams which needs to be spoken of disparagingly; on the contrary, they are a singularly interesting class of mental phenomena, capable of...
-The Nature of Dreaming. Part 12
Sileni, and sylvans, and fawns, And the nymphs of the woods and waves; though sometimes there might be gloomier intimations of a retributive Nemesis, and unconquerable Destiny, and even Pallas herse...







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