Ground Plan Of Cities 51DAYTON. O. Fig. 7. Lots face Main St., the most valuable frontage, an exception to the generalflat.

DAYTON. O. Fig. 7. Lots face Main St., the most valuable frontage, an exception to the generalflat.

Ground Plan Of Cities 53HOUSTON.TEXAS Fig. 8. Lots face all four streets in proportion to value. Land closely platted.

HOUSTON.TEXAS Fig. 8. Lots face all four streets in proportion to value. Land closely platted.

MINNEAPOLIS Fig. 9. Similar to No. 8, but a larger block.

MINNEAPOLIS Fig. 9. Similar to No. 8, but a larger block.

NEW YORK Fig. 10. Typical long New York block; end lots facing on avenues.

NEW YORK Fig. 10. Typical long New York block; end lots facing on avenues.

SALT LAKE CITY Fig. 11. Irregular cutting through very large block.

SALT LAKE CITY Fig. 11. Irregular cutting through very large block.

Fig. 12. Lots platted to face square, originally designed to be city center.

Fig. 12. Lots platted to face square, originally designed to be city-center.

The proportion of city area used for streets and alleys ranges from about 35 per cent. in Vienna and New York to 55 per cent. in Washington. The first theoretical aspect of the division of a city's area into public and private land, is that the more land given up to streets the greater the dispersion of business and area covered by the city. Limiting this tendency would be a natural increase in the height of buildings, on account of wide streets and greater light and air obtained on the smaller building plots remaining. Practically the proportion between public and private land has but little influence on the density of city population, although there is an economic mean in the proportion between land for communication and land for buildings, which varies according to the utilization of land and which makes itself felt when disregarded in either direction by loss of income.

INDIANAPOLIS . IND Fig. 13. Waste of land where circle lots deepest. Also monument interferes with traffic in both directions and injures both streets.

INDIANAPOLIS . IND Fig. 13. Waste of land where circle lots deepest. Also monument interferes with traffic in both directions and injures both streets.

The unit, both as to the depth and width of lots, from which a plat should be built up, consists of the average shop in the busi-ness district and the average dwelling in the residence district Since the growth of cities leads normally to the ultimate conversion of residence land into business land, a uniform system of platting suitable for business purposes throughout the entire

Old utilization of high class residence block. (Shaded surfaces represent houses.) New York.

Old utilization of high-class residence block. (Shaded surfaces represent houses.) New York.

Modern utilization of high class residence block