It is often advisable to have a record of wild lands or of city lots, which may be carried in the pocket. In such cases, the most convenient form is a small loose-leaf book, • 5 X 7 3/4 inches, in which each page is devoted to one piece of property and shows the important particulars. For lands divided into United States townships, pocket plats may be used, on each page of which a skeleton township is ruled.

RE. No

No

Price $

Bet.

Height

Material

Lot

Size

Heated by

Booms

Lease

Plumbing

Survey

Assd. Val.

Mtge.

Price

Ins

Due

Improvements

Remarks

1st $

1st $

2nd $

2nd$

3rd $

3rd $

4th $

4rd $

5th $

5th $

Total-Rental $

o

Form 27. Card Properly Record (face).

Form 28. Card Property Record (back)

Form 28. Card Property Record (back).

Still another alternative is to keep a card index, subdivided so that it is possible to remove quickly all the cards relating to a certain district, and carry them when making an examination on the grounds. A card record of this style is shown in Forms 27 and 28, the particulars being practically the same as would appear in the small loose-leaf book mentioned above.

Such records are almost essential, as much information can best be secured on the grounds and, with this pocket record, may be immediately entered in its appropriate place. The record then forms also a tickler, which may be carried in the pocket during inspection trips or when showing properties to prospective buyers.