Banksia, a name given to several distinct genera of plants in honor of Sir Joseph Banks. The one to which the name properly applies belongs to the family of proteacece, and was named by Linnrcus in honor of its discoverer, who accompanied Capt. Cook in his second voyage. The genus comprises several species, nearly all natives of Australia and the neighboring islands, where their beautiful forms and foliage are a conspicuous part of the landscape. The colonists consider their presence a mark of bad land. The leaves are hard, often broad, and closely cover the branches; the flower and fruit are in compact blunt cones, usually downy or woolly, and the flowers project so as to form a spike. As ornamental shrubs the banksias have been much cultivated, and they will bear the climate of the southern states or of England with slight protection. All are easily propagated from seeds. The banksia of

Banksia speciosa.

Banksia speciosa.

Forster is to be referred to the genus pimelea; that of Konig to castus, a genus of the ginger family; and that of Bruce to Brayera, a genus of rosacea. The last, under the name of cusso, was found by the distinguished African traveller in the high country of Abyssinia, where a decoction of its leaves was used commonly as an authelmintic.