Barrackpoor, a town and military cantonment of Bengal, on the E. bank of the Iloogly, about 10 m. N. N. E. of Calcutta. It is a favorite retreat for the Europeans of Calcutta, and contains the country residence of the governor general. The town itself is irregularly built, most of the houses being bungalows, embosomed among lofty trees, and the country around is profusely wooded. It possesses a park of 250 acres, with a fine collection of Indian zoology, and a stud of elephants, maintained mainly for the recreation of the guests of the governor general. Barrackpoor is noted as the place in which the first blood was shed in the sepoy mutiny. The town was a convenient station for military operations in the eastern part of Bengal, and for any sudden emergency at Calcutta. Four native regiments, with European officers, were stationed there. Discontent had arisen among the men, who supposed that the new cartridges issued to them were greased with animal fat, and one regiment was disbanded in February, 1857. On March 29 an armed sepoy marched about, declaring that he would shoot the first European he met. He wounded a European lieutenant, and a native officer refused to arrest him.

Both were afterward arrested, tried by court-martial, and executed April 5; and a few days later the regiment to which they belonged was disbanded. After the suppression of the mutiny extensive barracks were erected here for British troops.

Barrackpoor.

Barrackpoor.