Bithoor, Or Bittoor, a town of Hindostan, province of Allahabad, on the Ganges, 21 m. N. W. of Cawnpore; pop. about 9,000. As a religious city it enjoys high repute, and every year in November and December is the scene of a festival. Besides a number of Hindoo temples, it has magnificent ghauts, or flights of steps, on the brink of the sacred river, where the priests and worshippers of Brahma perform their prescribed ablutions. One of these ghauts is held to have been honored by the presence of Brahma himself, who there sacrificed a horse after creating the universe. A pin fixed in one of the steps, and believed to have dropped from the god's slipper on that occasion, is an object of deep veneration. For a long period this town was the residence of the chiefs of the Mahrattas, the last of whom died without issue in 1851. His estate then reverted to the East India company, to the exclusion of the claim of an adopted son, Dhundoo Punt, who was, however, permitted to occupy the town, and is known by his title of the Nena Sahib. He became the leader of the sepoy mutineers in 1857-8. In July, 1857, Gen. Havelock drove the Nena from the town and dismantled it; it was subsequently reoccupied by the mutineers, and after a well fought battle again taken by Havelock, Aug. 16.

Ghaut on the Ganges.

Ghaut on the Ganges.