Canosa (anc. Canusium), a town of Italy, in the province of Bari, 14 m. S. W. of Barletta; pop. about 10,000. It contains a cathedral of the 6th century, the remains of a triumphal arch near the river Ofanto, of a splendid amphitheatre, and the tomb of Bohemond, prince of Antioch. Canusium was subdued by the Romans in 318 B. C, until which time it had been hostile to Rome ever since the Samnite war. Herodes Atticus constructed an aqueduct to supply it with good water. The Romans called the inhabitants bilingues, as they spoke both Greek and Oscan. The mule drivers of Canusium were noted for their skill, and were always selected by Nero as his charioteers. The remains of the Roman army after the defeat of Cannae, about 8 m. distant, took refuge in Canusium. It was on the direct route from Brundusium (Brindisi) to Rome. Remarkable ancient tombs discovered in 1803, in the vicinity of Canosa, whose contents were sent to the museum of Naples, were described by Millin (Paris, 1813).

Canobus.

Canobus.

Ancient Tomb at Canosa.

Ancient Tomb at Canosa.