Cape Town, the capital of Cape Colony, S. Africa, situated at the bottom of Table bay, and at the foot of Table mountain, lat. 33° 56' S., Ion. 18° 28' E., about 32 m. N. of the Cape of Good Hope; pop. in 1865, 28,457, of whom two thirds were whites. It is the seat of an Anglican bishop, who is the metropolitan of the dioceses of S. Africa, and also of a Roman Catholic bishop. The town is well built and well laid out. There is a fortress near it of considerable strength. Table bay is capacious, but the anchorage is rendered uncertain by the heavy swell of the Atlantic. Cape Town is a station for astronomical observations, and Sir John Herschel passed two years at this place for the purpose of studying the heavens of the southern hemisphere. The chief public buildings are the government house, the colonial office, the barracks, the exchange, the post office, the public library, three Anglican and four English dissenting churches, a Dutch Reformed church capable of holding 2,000 persons, and a handsome Roman Catholic church. The streets are laid out at right angles. Most of the houses are built of brick, faced with stucco.

There is a capacious public walk, between the gardens of the government house and the botanical garden.

Cape Town, from Table Bay.

Cape Town, from Table Bay.