Cardiff, the county town of Glamorganshire, Wales, on the river Taff, near its entrance into the Severn, 22 m. W. of Bristol; pop. in 1871, 39,675. At the beginning of this century Cardiff was a mere village; but the construction of a fine dock by the marquis of Bute, a large local proprietor, and the consequent trade from the collieries of South Wales, converted it into an important commercial, town. It is now the principal shipping port of the Welsh steam coal, besides iron, slates, and other local products. The Glamorganshire canal and the Taff railway terminate here, and the facilities for commerce have been greatly extended by the construction of a ship canal between the harbor and the town. In 1870 the exports amounted to £3,106,571, and the imports to £593,605. The greater part of the town is modern, and consists of good buildings, including two fine churches and several other places of worship, an infirmary hospital, a union workhouse, and a town hall 175 ft. long, in the Italian style. There is an ancient castle, which has been converted into a modem mansion, and is now in possession of the marquis of Bute.

Cardiff, from the Castle. (See p. 778).

Cardiff, from the Castle. (See p. 778).