Chewink, a name popularly given to the ground robin or towhee bunting (pipito ery-throphthalmus, Vieill.), from its usual note. It belongs to the family of fringillidae or finches, and the genus includes several species. The chewink is about 8 3/4 inches long, the wing 3 3/4, and the tail a little over 4 inches. The upper parts generally, head and neck all round, and upper part of breast, are glossy black, sharply defined against the pure white which extends to the vent, but is bounded on the sides and under the wings by light chestnut; wings and tail black marked with white; iris red, as the specific name implies. The bill is stout and curved, the feet large with strong curved claws, and the tail considerably longer than the wings. The female is brown where the male is black. It is a common bird in America east of the Missouri, generally seen upon the ground among low bushes; its song is sweet and mellow. The nest is on the ground, in a small hole made for the purpose, and the four to six eggs are pale flesh-colored, with dark spots. Two or three broods are raised in a season. Similar species are found west of the Rocky mountains, in California, and in Mexico. The food consists of worms and insects, in the search for which it seems so entirely absorbed that it may be very closely approached.

It goes south in October, returning in the spring.

Chewink.

Chewink.