Compiegne (Under The Early Frankish Kings Compendium), a town of France, in the department of Oise, on the left bank of the river Oise, near the mouth of the Aisne, and on the great northern railway, 43 m. N. N. E. of Paris; pop. in 1866,12,150. It contains a celebrated palace, originally built by Louis IX., rebuilt by Louis XIV., and improved by Louis XV. and Louis XVI., and by Napoleon I. From very early times Compiegne was a favorite residence of the kings of France; several parliaments were held there, and Joan of Arc was taken prisoner before its walls, the spot of her capture, marked by the ruined tour de la Pu-celle, being still pointed out. In 1624 a treaty between Holland and France was signed at Compiegne. Charles IV., ex-king of Spain, resided some time in its palace, and Napoleon's first meeting with Maria Louisa took place here. Napoleon III. and his court frequently visited the place; the shooting parties given by him in the large adjoining forest, which abounds in game, enjoyed a high reputation in the fashionable world. The grounds were thrown open to the public in 1871. The town contains three splendid churches, a picturesque town hall, a fine bridge (pont neuf) over the Oise, a theatre, various other public buildings, and a public library.

Palace at Compiegne.

Palace at Compiegne.