Guebres , or Ghebers (Turkish, Ghiavrs, Ghaurs, and Giaours, infidels), a name applied to those Persians who adhered to the ancient religion of Zoroaster after the great majority of the nation had been converted to Mohammedanism, and who are generally known by Europeans as fire worshippers. They call themselves Beh-Din, "those of excellent belief." The Arabs completed the conquest of Persia in the 7th century, and the great mass of the nation adopted the faith of the conquerors. Those who refused to do so were subjected to persecution. Some of them took refuge in the wilderness of Khorasan, and others in Kohistan. The latter in the 9th century emigrated to India and settled in the neighborhood of Surat. Their descendants still inhabit the same region, and are called Parsees. (See Parsees.) The descendants of those who remained in Persia have gradually decreased in numbers and sunk into ignorance and poverty, though still preserving a reputation for honesty, chastity, industry, and obedience to law, superior to that of the other Persians. They are estimated to number about 7,000. They reside chiefly in Yezd and the surrounding villages, but are found here and there over the whole of Persia. A celebrated temple of the Guebres is situated near the Russian town of Baku, on the Caspian sea. (See Baku.) For an account of their religion, see Zendavesta, and Zoroaster.

Guebre Priests.

Guebre Priests.