Horned Frog, Or Horned Toad an iguanian lizard of the genus phrynosoma (Wiegmann). In its general aspect it somewhat resembles a frog, and in its sluggishness a toad, hence the common names; but it is a true lizard, and in no respect a batrachian. The genus, which comprises about half a dozen species, all North American, is characterized by a more or less circular or oval body, flattened and covered with tuberculated scales; head short, triangular, with prominent vertex, and sharp spines or rough knobs; the temporal region much developed; neck very short and with transverse folds underneath; nostrils lateral, near the snout; tympanum visible but depressed; den-tated margin on the flanks; no spinal or caudal crest; tail short and conical, with similar spiny scales; legs of nearly equal length and size, with five toes on each, moderate, the second the longest, and with sharp and curved nails; femoral pores, but no anal present. The species are found in California, Oregon, Mexico, and the S. W. states. For full descriptions of the species by Messrs. Baird and Girard, see Capt. Stansbury's "Expedition to Great Salt Lake," and vol. ii. of the "Mexican Boundary Survey." The best known species is the P. cornutum, about 4 1/2 inches long; the general color above is a dusky gray, with black bars and markings; below, silvery white.

This species is not unfrequently carried to the north from Texas; in confinement it is sluggish and will rarely take food, but it is said to be active in pursuit of its insect prey in the wild state; it is very gentle in its disposition. It passes the winter in a state of lethargy in holes dug by various rodents, appearing about April and disappearing about October, at which seasons travellers are frequently annoyed by their seeking shelter from the cold night air in the folds of their blankets; their spiny covering makes them not very comfortable bedfellows. - This name has also been given to a true batrachian, a frog of the genus ceratophrys, in which the head is more or less roughened and spiny; it is three times as large as the common frog, with an enormous mouth. All the species live in tropical South America, and feed upon small rodents, birds, other frogs, toads, and mollusks.

Phrynosoma cornutum.

Phrynosoma cornutum.

Ceratophrys cornuta.

Ceratophrys cornuta.