I. A variety of hemp produced in India, formerly supposed to be a distinct species, and called cannabis Indica. (See

Indian Hemp (Apocynum cannabinum).

Indian Hemp (Apocynum cannabinum).

Hemp, vol. viii., p. 632.) II. An American perennial herb, apocynum cannabinum, of the order apocynacea, or dogbane family. The plant throws up several branching stems, 2 to 3 ft. high, with opposite, mucronate leaves, which are smooth or downy, and numerous, many-flowered cymes. The flowers are small, bell-shaped, greenish white, the corolla with five triangular appendages in the throat; stamens five, inserted on the base of the corolla, and slightly adhering to the stigma by their filaments; fruit of two long slender follicles with silky tufted seeds. It has a milky juice, and the bark has an exceedingly tough fibre, the use of which by the aborigines for making cordage, fishing nets, etc, no doubt gave it the common name. We know of no extensive experiments in utilizing this fibre, which is whiter and stronger than that of hemp. The root of this plant is sometimes used in medicine, it being powerfully emetic and cathartic in doses of 15 to 30 grains of the powdered dry root, or a similar amount in the form of a decoction; it has been found efficacious in dropsy. It grows in most of the states, and has other local names; in South Carolina it is known as Gen. Marion's weed, as that leader is said to have used it in the diseases of his camp.

Another species, A. an-drosaeinifolium, equally common, is a more spreading plant, with much larger pale rose-colored flowers, and used as a prompt emetic; it is known as dogbane and bitter-root.