Lizula, a genus of glumaceous plants, called wood rushes; they belong to the juncaceae or rush family, but differ from jancus, the rush proper, in having softer, flatter, and grass-like leaves; their pod is one-celled and three-seeded, while in the rush it is many-seeded and often three-celled. There are five species found in the northern states, three of which are peculiar to high mountains or far northern localities, while two are quite common in woods, meadows, and pastures; all of our species are natives of Europe also. The hairy wood rush (L. pilosa) is common in woods, and the field wood rush (L. campestris) is usually found in drier places; they both flower early in May; the former has but one flower to each stalk of the umbel, while the latter has several flowers in compact clusters to each stalk. In all the species the flowers have the general structure of the lily family, but the six sepals are husklike and green or straw-colored. The plants have no important use, but are interesting in their structure and for their early flowering.

Field Wood Rush (Luzula campestris).

Field Wood Rush (Luzula campestris).