Genet (genetta, Cuv.), a digitigrade carnivorous mammal of the family viverridce, inhabiting Africa, and occasionally found in southern Europe. The dentition and structural characters are the same as in the civet, the principal difference being that the anal pouch which contains the glands secreting the odorous substance is much less developed and prominent in the genet than in the civet. The common genet of Barbary (viverra genetta, Linn.; G. vulgaris, Cuv.) is ashy gray, with blackish spots; the tail is nearly as long as the body, with long hair and 10 or 11 dark and light rings; the length of the body is about a foot and the tail about the same, and the height 5 in. It is only semi-carnivorous, and will live in captivity wholly on vegetable food. The claws are sharp, semi-retractile, and well adapted for climbing; the anal secretion has a musky odor; as in other nocturnal animals, the pupil is vertical. The habits of the genet are like those of the weasel tribe; it is easily tamed, and is sometimes employed to catch rats and mice in houses; the period of gestation in captivity is about four months.

The pale genet (G. Senegalensis, Fischer), or fossane, resembles the former species, and is reddish gray with pale spots above the eyes, brown bands and spots on the body and limbs, and an obscurely ringed tail. Both species prey upon small mammals, birds, and reptiles, and are not averse to fruits. Several other species are described.

Common Genet (Genetta vulgaris).

Common Genet (Genetta vulgaris).

Pale Genet (Genetta Senegalensis).

Pale Genet (Genetta Senegalensis).