The fabric is first saturated with a dilute celluloid solution of the consistency of olive oil, which solution penetrates deeply into the tissue; dry quickly in a heating chamber and saturate with a more concentrated celluloid solution, about as viscous as molasses. If oil be added to the celluloid solution, the quantity should be small in the first solution, e. g., 1 to 2 per cent, in the following ones 5 to 8 per cent, while the outer layer contains very little or no oil. A fabric impregnated in this manner possesses a very flexible surface, because the outer layer may be very thin, while the interior consists of many flexible fibers surrounded by celluloid.

CELLULOID CEMENTS AND GLUES:

See Adhesives.

CELLULOID LACQUER:

See Lacquer.

CELLULOID PUTTY:

See Cements.

Cements

(See also Putties.)

For Adhesive Cements intended for repairing broken articles, see Adhesives.

Putty for Celluloid

To fasten celluloid to wood, tin, etc., use a compound of 2 parts shellac, 3 parts spirit of camphor, and 4 parts strong alcohol.