Newspapers, arecertain publications, which appear daily, weekly, or at other stated periods of the week, in order to communicate the most important political, domestic, or literary information.

The first English newspapers were published in the year 1612, since which time they have been greatly increased, so that now several millions of copies are circulated every year.—Independently of their utility as vehicles of general intelligence, these prints certainly contribute to disseminate useful knowledge of a very diversified nature : and, so long as they are conducted with the strictest adherence to truth and decorum, they may be justly considered as a national benefit. If, however, a contrary conduct is pursued, and newspapers are made subservient to the sordid views and intrigues of a party, they not only disgrace their ostensible editors, conductors, or proprietors, but are highly prejudicial to the interests of society ; inasmuch as they become the records of falsehood, either by propagating, and often enlarging upon calumnious reports, or by misrepresenting matters so as to exhibit both the object and the subject of the paragraph in an odious light ; or, by perpetuating national prejudices and animosities ; or, lastly, by displaying their ignorance of the geographical and political situation of other countries connected with the British empire.

As it is not our intention to undertake the ungrateful task of pointing out the different ministerial and opposition prints, or to draw the line between those which are more or less authentic in their sources of information, we shall merely enumerate the different new papers at present published in the United Kingdom.

English Country Papers :

At Birmingham, 2 ; Bristol, 5 ; Bath, 3 ; Bury, 1 ; Blackburn, 1 ; Cambridge, 2; Canterbury, 2; Carlisle, 1; Chelmsford, 1; Chester, 2 ; County Chronicle, and Herald (eighty miles round London), 2; Coventry, 1 ; Cumberland, 1 ; Derby, 1 ; Dorchester, 1; Don-caster, 1 ; Essex, 1 ; Exeter, 2; Gloucester, 1 ; Hampshire, 1; Hull, 2; Hereford, 1; Ipswich, 1; Lancaster, 1; Leeds, 2 ; Liverpool, 3 ; Leicester, 1; Lynn, 1 ; Manchester, 3 ; Maidstone, 1 ; Newcastle, 3; Northampton, 1; Norfolk, 1; Norwich, 1 ; Nottingham, 1; Oxford, 1; Portsmouth, 2; Reading, 1; Sussex Advertiser, 1 ; (Sussex, Hants, Surrey, and Kent) ; Sherborne, 1 ; Salisbury, 1 ; Sheffield, 1 ; Shrewsbury, 2; Stamford, 1 ; Staffordshire Advertiser, 1 ; Worcester, 2 ; and York, 3.

Scotch Papers.

At Aberdeen, 1 ; Dumfries, 1 ; Edinburgh, 8; Glasgow 3 ; and at Kelso, 2.

Irish Papers.

At Athlone, 1; Belfast, 1 ; Cork, 3; Clare, 1 ; Clonmell, 1 ; Dublin, 9; Drogheda, 1 ; Ennis, 1 ; Kerry, 1 ; Limerick, 2 ; Lein-ster, 1 ; Londonderry, 1 ; Sligo, 1; Strabane, 1 ; Waterford, 1 ; and Wexford, l.

London Papers.

Every Morning—Morning Post; Morning Chronicle ; Morning Advertiser ; Morning Herald ; Oracle and Daily Advertiser; Public Ledger; Times ; and True BriEvery Evening - Courier ; Star : Sun ; and Traveller.

Every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Evening—Commercial Chronicle; English Chronicle ; General Evening Post ; London Evening Post; Express and Herald ; London Chronicle ; St. James's Chronicle ; and Whitehall Evening Post.

Every Monday,Wednesday, and Friday Evening—Evening Mail; London Packet ; and Lloyd's Evening Pest.

Every Wednesday—Weekly Register.

Every Tuesday and Saturday—London Gazette (by authority).

Every Tuesday and Friday—; Courier de Londres.

Every third Saturday in the Month—Hue and Cry (Police Gazette).

Every Saturday—Baldwin's Journal ; Mirror of the Times; Old British Spy ; Say's Craftsman; and Westminster Journal.

Every Sunday—Bell's Messenger; Monitor; Observer; Recorder and Reformer; Review; Selector; and Dispatch.

From this enumeration it appears, that in the United Kingdom, there are not less than 153 distinct Newspapers, of which 72 are published in the different counties of England, 39) in the Metropolis, 15 in Scotland, and 27 in Ireland.