Caisses Or Marrons

The variety of fireworks originally named marrons by the French is still popular, and is frequently shown under different names. The term caisse is employed to describe a similar piece for which the case is cubical. The charge used in these fireworks is the same, whether the pasteboard container has a cubical or a cylindrical form. The load is either of powder merely, or of a fulminating composition, which has a much greater violence. When the marron or caisse is loaded with powder, it is tightly wrapped with strong tarred string, in order to increase the force of the explosion. But when the fulminating composition is used, the wrapping is done with a lighter cord, and the turns about the container are not in the closest possible contact with one another.

The fulminating composition may be made as follows:

Chlorate of potash......................

4

Sulphur......................

1

Charcoal (light wood)......................

1

Another formula is:

Chlorate of potash..................

12

Antimony...........................

12

It is to be noted that, while the first formula affords a composition of great strength, the second is still more violent. It is also of such susceptibility that extraordinary care is required in the handling of it, or a premature explosion may result.