The following is the form for a spiral: Standing in the position illustrated in Figure 1 on punting, step forward and to the right with the right foot for about two feet and follow this with the left foot which is carried about one yard and slightly to the right. Then drop the ball to the right foot as it is swung forward, toe turned down as in Figure 2, and finish the kick as in Figure 3. The leg should be rigid as the foot strikes the ball. The knee joint should be locked and straight. The ball should come to the foot in almost exactly the same position in which it is held in the hands in Figure 1, and should be laid out on the instep as it is kicked. Do not throw it. The ball must come to the foot in this way and at the right time, or the punt will be inaccurate. There must be no "fluke kicks" in the games.

Another reason why the ball should he practically laid out on the foot is the fact that, when kicking on a wet or windy day, there is not much chance for the ball to change its position between the time it leaves the hand and reaches the foot. In kicking, the ball must be watched all the time, for no one can hit the object at which he aims unless he has his eye on it. The ball must not be kicked from a point too near the kicker, for that will yield a result very much in the nature of a throw. It should be a little above knee-high to the kicker at the moment when it meets the foot.

Figure Two.   How the foot should meet the ball, distance ball should be out in front of body and height ball should be from ground. Ball should hit the instep.

Figure Two. - How the foot should meet the ball, distance ball should be out in front of body and height ball should be from ground. Ball should hit the instep.

It must be struck by the foot near the center and the foot driven straight ahead for an instant with a quick finish toward the point of the left shoulder. This will give the ball the rotary motion of the spiral.

Practice this form for some time, gradually putting more and more speed and force into the kick.

The direction of the kick, as well as the height of the ball, should always be kept in mind. It is not the force that is put into the whole motion of the kick that will give it distance, but the snap that is put into the kg at the moment it strikes the ball. The steps taken just before the ball is kicked must not carry the kicker much forward toward the center. If this is the case the kicker will be up against his own line and in a position where the kick can be easily blocked by the opponents.

The steps should be short. There is no necessity for running a foot race before the ball is kicked. It is the force and energy put into the kicking leg at the moment of contact that will give distance to the kick, not the two steps before the final swing of the leg.

The same general directions may be followed when learning the end-over-end punt, with the exception of the manner in which the ball is dropped to the foot.