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Modern Golf | by Harold H. Hilton



THE first lesson to be learned by the aspiring golfer is the value of practice. This is the beginning and end of excellence - the fundamental secret of improvement, other things being equal. Speaking for myself, I am convinced that the present position I hold in the golfing world is in a very great measure due to the faculty I am gifted with, of being able to proceed out to some quiet corner of the links, with just a couple of clubs and a dozen balls, and religiously set myself the task of trying to find out the peculiarities and idiosyncrasies of these particular weapons. To many this procedure may seem a somewhat dull and uninteresting task, but personally I have always found it to be a most fascinating pastime, and although nowadays my enthusiasm for practice may not be quite so marked as it was ten or twenty years ago, still I must candidly acknowledge enjoying even to this day an hour all alone by myself on the links more than the pleasure of participating in the most interesting and pleasant match one can imagine. Moreover, I consider that a young player is apt to gain more knowledge in such an hour of solitude than he is at all likely to acquire in playing thirty-six holes against even the finest players in the land.

TitleModern Golf
AuthorHarold H. Hilton
PublisherOuting Publishing Company
Year1913
Copyright1913, Outing Publishing Company
AmazonModern Golf

Illustrated with Photographs

Handbooks

Modern Golf 2
-Chapter I. Practice - The Foundation Of Excellence
THE first lesson to be learned by the aspiring golfer is the value of practice. This is the beginning and end of excellence - the fundamental secret of improvement, other things being equal. Speaking ...
-Practice - The Foundation Of Excellence. Continued
When I was in America the first time the fact was very much impressed upon me that in many ways the young American player was severely handicapped in comparison with the British player. First, on acco...
-Chapter II. The Physical Side
ONE of the primary problems of golf is the exact place to be assigned to sheer strength. Like most other questions, it has two sides, and it is worth while to see how the arguments fall. First for th...
-The Physical Side. Continued
The secret of being able to hit a golf ball a very long way is freedom of action and the application of strength. To be a long driver it is not altogether necessary to be abnormally strong muscularly....
-Chapter III. The Mental And Temperamental
THE fact should be thoroughly established by this time that there is much more to golf than the mere ability to swing the club hard and true. It must be borne in mind that this swinging must be kept u...
-The Mental And Temperamental. Continued
An anticipatory brain of an imaginative character is an ill possession for a golfer to be blessed with; it is not of the least service to him in any way, and it is merely prone to take his attention a...
-Chapter IV. Clubs - Past And Present
HITHERTO we have been discussing the workman rather than his tools. Now for the latter, and particularly the clubs of to-day as compared with those of the old days. In my recollection, which extends o...
-Clubs - Past And Present. Part 2
I believe that Harry Vardon has always remained faithful to the old-fashioned method of glueing the head to the shaft, and he is probably the most accurate driver of all players. Be it said, however, ...
-Clubs - Past And Present. Part 3
It is, however, a comparatively simple matter to alter the lie of an iron club, as any accomplished workman will put the nose of the club in a vise, and with one or two carefully dealt blows with a wo...
-Chapter V. The Wooden Clubs
OF all the clubs used in the game, the wooden clubs are those which in almost every case receive the first consideration. This is a natural order, but probably there are many American readers who do n...
-The Wooden Clubs. Continued
On such occasions the player should hit the ball well within his physical powers; he has proved to himself that it is not his day for his usual all out methods, so he should wisely go into his shell...
-Chapter VI. Long Vs. Short Shafts
CLOSELY allied to the main question of the wooden clubs is the subsidiary one of length of shaft. The extremely long shaft has had many adherents and probably as many opponents. Of course, the obvious...
-Chapter VII. Playing The Approach
APPROACH play is admittedly the very backbone of the game of golf. In a previous chapter I (Practice - The Foundation Of Excellence) have tried to point out that many golfers do not lay sufficient str...
-Playing The Approach. Continued
John Ball. Eight Times British Amateur Champion Rated by Many as the Best Amateur in Great Britain impart a great amount of underspin to the ball. From what I saw of American courses they are pecul...
-Chapter VIII. "Getting Up" On Winter Greens
THERE is no time when the error of approaching short becomes so glaring as in the winter. This is peculiarly true in England, and probably applies more or less in the States. Unless there has been a w...
-Chapter IX. Putting And Putters
ASSUMING that we have now acquired the mental habit of at least trying to be up on our approaches, what happens after we are on the green? It is an axiom of the game that more matches are won or lost ...
-Chapter X. Improvements In Play
HAVING passed in brief review the important phases and attributes of the game in some detail, it is worth while taking a bird's-eye view of the game as a whole, particularly with reference to its pres...
-Improvements In Play. Continued
That I cannot believe is true, for although I am not going to say that the golf played in the present day is on the average in any marked degree better than it was twelve to fourteen years ago, still ...
-Chapter XI. The Clothes For The Game
IT is proper that the final chapter should be given to the minor, but none the less important question of clothes. Golf has always had its own standards in this respect, changing from time to time to ...







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