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The World Of Golf | by Garden Smith



This book is not a manual of instruction. A man can no more be taught to play golf by a book, than he can be made virtuous by Act of Parliament. But "the world of golf" is wide, and it is hoped that the following chapters may be found to contain some matters of golfing interest not yet dealt with, and to suggest some new points of view. If, in this way, the book can be regarded as a slight contribution to the cause of golf, the Author, who owes the game much, will be completely satisfied.

TitleThe World Of Golf
AuthorGarden Smith
PublisherA. D. Innes & Company
Year1898
Copyright1898, A. D. Innes & Company
AmazonThe World Of Golf
The World Of Golf

With Chapters contributed by W. J. MacGeagh, W. G. Van Tassel Sutphen, and Miss Amy Pascoe

Illustrated

To Robert Leicester Harmsworth In Souvenir Of Many Golfing Holidays, These Chapters Are Affectionately Inscribed

The Isthmian Library

Edited by B. Fletcher Robinson

No. 3.

-Chapter I. Golf - Its Origin And Nature
THE early history of golf, like that of most other ancient sports, is obscure and fragmentary, while its origin, buried in vague and voiceless prehistoric times, can only be guessed at. No doubt it al...
-Golf - Its Origin And Nature. Continued
Although everybody must admit the fascination of the thing, it is a somewhat curious matter, when one comes to consider it, this hitting of a ball with a bat or club. So universal and clamorous an ins...
-Chapter II. St. Andrews
SAINT ANDREWS est situe a l'Est de l'Ecosse, dans le voisinage de la puissante cite de Glasgow. C'est un siege de science et d'erudition. La beaut du paysage, la vigueur de l'air y attirent auss...
-St. Andrews. Part 2
The continued hold which golf has kept on St. Andrews links is sufficient proof of their lasting excellence, and of the fascination which they exercise on the golfer's mind. A green so old in story, w...
-St. Andrews. Part 3
If these figures can be held to prove anything at all, it would appear that from 350 to 400 yards is a good length for a hole, and that somewhere between 350 and 200 yards is a bad length. In other w...
-Chapter III. Of Clubs And Balls
THE golfer is one thing and his set of clubs is another, but it is not too much to say that, in most cases, it is possible to gauge a golfer's capacity by his clubs. There are plenty of clubs about, b...
-Chapter IV. Prestwick
ON the eastern shore of the Firth of Clyde, a little to the north of Ayr, lie the famous links of Prestwick, famous as the headquarters of golf on the west coast of Scotland and as the scene of many m...
-Prestwick. Continued
The next hole is one of the most famous in golfing geography. It is the Cardinal, and the huge bunker from which the hole is named, with its wide-spreading sand and high battlements of black wooden ...
-Chapter V. Caddies
CADDIES may be divided into three classes. There is the grown up, sometimes elderly, golfing mentor, who is still found at one or two old-established golfing centres in Scotland - the caddie of histor...
-Caddies. Continued
But it should be remembered, that the St. Andrews rules dealing with the uses of caddies, were framed at a time before championships, or competitions with a large field of competitors, were in existen...
-Chapter VI. The Links Of East Lothian
THE country lying east of Edinburgh and Leith, which is bounded on the south by the Pentlands and Lammermoors, and which stretches as far as Dunbar, along the southward shore of what Victor Hugo calls...
-The Links Of East Lothian. Part 2
There are to-day no fewer than six golf courses, of eighteen holes, in this neighbourhood, all lying so close to each other that a round can be played on each in the course of a summer's day, and in a...
-The Links Of East Lothian. Part 3
From the gate near Archerfield House, which opens on the links, the view is lovely in the extreme. It is nature unadorned and full of the simple beauty and pathetic suggestiveness of Scottish lands...
-Chapter VII. The Making And Keeping Of Golf Courses
GOLF may be played anywhere - that is, anywhere where there is room - but the quality of the golf will depend upon the kind of place it is played on, and the manner in which the ground is laid out and...
-The Making And Keeping Of Golf Courses. Part 2
In the case of our first hole, in burning and hacking a course of 60 or 80 yards through the gorse and grubbing up the roots, all holes will have to be filled up and returfed; but the man who tops his...
-The Making And Keeping Of Golf Courses. Part 3
In making teeing grounds, see that they are placed absolutely at right angles to the line for the hole; and that the discs are also always placed at the same angle. Nothing is more disconcerting, or f...
-Chapter VIII. Hoylake
SOMEWHERE in the late sixties, roughly speaking about thirty years ago, two Scotchmen were spending a few days at Hoylake. One of them was the late Robert Chambers, of the well-known firm of publish...
-Hoylake. Part 2
In these respects, in addition to its excellent climate, Hoylake enjoys advantages which are denied to many other first-class greens. Neither Prestwick, nor Sandwich, nor Westward Ho! are residential ...
-Hoylake. Part 3
The next is another new hole, called the Briars, and is one of the most sporting holes to be found anywhere. To top the tee shot, is to land in unnegotiable gorse. To heel, is goodbye to a four; and...
-Chapter IX. The Open Championship, 1897
LOVELY summer-like weather prevailed at Hoylake, in the month of May, for the week in which, for the first time on this course, the open championship was played. Cloudless skies overhead, and the hot ...
-The Open Championship, 1897. Continued
1st Day's Score. 2nd Day's Score. Mr. H. H. Hilton 155 . 84 75 = 159 = 314 J. Braid ... 154 . 82...
-Chapter X. Sandwich
THE story of Sandwich, from the earliest historical period till the middle of the seventeenth century, is intimately bound up with the history and fortunes of England. In almost every event of histori...
-Sandwich. Part 2
Sandwich is now within three hours' railway journey of Cannon Street. A very good train leaves a little before 5 p.m. and lands the golfer at the Bell Hotel - a 'bus from which meets all trains - in t...
-Sandwich. Part 3
We are now on the confines of Deal, and here we turn to the left and play for the 5th hole, along a valley, in the direction of Pegwell Bay. If the wind be favourable, the green can be reached in one,...
-Sandwich. Part 4
The next hole, the 15th, is another somewhat puzzling hole. The first bunker is not formidable, for it can easily be carried from the tee, and the course is here wide. But the green is guarded, at rig...
-Chapter XI. Concerning Style
PEOPLE who are ignorant of golf, and whose first introduction to the game is to watch a match between two first-class players, usually get the idea, that the accurate hitting of a golf ball is a very ...
-Concerning Style. Continued
The true golf swing is always of a circular nature, and the club-head should always pursue the same orbit, in its downward course, that it does in its upward, whether the elliptical curve it describes...
-Chapter XII. London Golf
TEN years ago there were not half a dozen golf clubs within hail of the Metropolis. To-day, within a radius of twelve miles of the chief railway stations, there are nearly fifty. When it is considered...
-London Golf. Continued
The common is now under the control of Conservators, and golf is only permitted on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. The course is, without doubt, one of the best near London. There are bad lies t...
-Chapter XIII. Golfing Etiquette
ONE would think that most of the ten provisions contained in the Etiquette of Golf, which are to be found at the end of the St. Andrews Rules, are so obvious, that it is a work of supererogation to ...
-Golfing Etiquette. Continued
The desire to excel, and the ambition to be first are natural and laudable feelings, in sport, as in all the other walks of life, and it is well and seemly that the conqueror should bear away with him...
-Chapter XIV. Continental Golf
FOR the toil-worn Briton, on holiday intent, it is always a pleasant thing, on a fine day, to sit on the upper deck of a Channel steamer, and watch the white cliffs of Albion fade o'er the waters blu...
-Continental Golf. Continued
There are hotels of all sizes and pensions galore. The Hotel Gassion and the Hotel de France are both of them palatial and luxurious, and there is no lack of hospitality and sociability amongst the re...
-Chapter XV. Twenty Years Since
IT seems a long time ago, that year away back in the seventies, when I first handled a golf club. In the northern town where I was born, golf was an ancient institution, how ancient nobody knew, for, ...
-Twenty Years Since. Continued
In some months, I too had made great progress at the game, and our fame, travelling beyond our native city, had reached other golfing centres. One day - it was during our school vacation, and I was ho...
-Chapter XVI. Three Famous Irish Links. By W. J. Macgeagh
THE progress which the game of golf has made in Ireland during the past ten years has been phenomenal. In this decade, no doubt, it has extended by leaps and bounds in England, and during the last two...
-Three Famous Irish Links. By W. J. Macgeagh. Part 2
The 5th hole - St. John's (for Newcastle possesses a saint, heaven-sent as leaven amongst its many sinners) - is 285 yards. There is a fine, hard, level space here for a good drive to take the very ...
-Three Famous Irish Links. By W. J. Macgeagh. Part 3
Herd's score reads - Out ... 344444345= 35 Home ... 445364535= 39 74 Pulford's reads - Out ... 435354333= 33 Home ...
-Three Famous Irish Links. By W. J. Macgeagh. Part 4
THE IRISH AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP, PORTRUSH, 1896. The 1st hole, treated as they all must be for our present purpose, i.e., from the medal tees, is two full drives and a short iron shot to rather a go...
-Three Famous Irish Links. By W. J. Macgeagh. Part 5
The 1st hole - The Lodge - is 150 yards in length - a good cleek shot. The green is small, and one must not pull the shot, or down a hill and in the emerald waters of Lough Swilly will be its restin...
-Three Famous Irish Links. By W. J. Macgeagh. Part 6
Now for the 14th - the Bin - we get another iron shot on to a hill, the hither side of which is pure, fine sand. This is one of the best greens on the course, and altogether a nice short hole. On th...
-Chapter XVII. Golf In America
GOLF in the United States is the amusement of the well-to-do classes alone, and there is nothing on this side of the Atlantic to compare with the public commons on which golf is played in the British ...
-Golf In America. Part 2
Golf on Long Island was introduced in the spring of 1891 by Mr. Duncan Cryder and Mr. Edward Mead, two members of the Southampton Summer Colony, who had seen and played the game at Biarritz. A course ...
-Golf In America. Part 3
MORRIS COUNTY CLUB-HOUSE, NEW JERSEY,. The membership is limited to 75, and there are about 70 names now upon the list. The initiation fee is $50, and the same amount is charged as the annual subsc...
-Golf In America. Part 4
The club-house is one of. the largest and best-appointed club buildings in the United States, and contains sleeping-rooms, a large swimming tank, concert hall, grill rooms, and every other possible co...
-Chapter XVIII. Ladies' Golf. By Miss A. B. Pascoe
THE origin of ladies' golf may be carried back to a period coeval with man's, if we sanction the hypothesis that fathers, husbands, and brothers of those early days resembled the male relatives of our...
-Ladies' Golf. By Miss A. B. Pascoe. Part 2
The conditions which have improved our greens have been apparently the higher standard of play exhibited by women who have the advantage of constant rounds on the long links, and the greater increase ...
-Ladies' Golf. By Miss A. B. Pascoe. Part 3
To Lady Margaret Hamilton Russell, who won the first three championships - a feat only surpassed by young Tommy, and equalled by the professionals Jamie Anderson and Bob Ferguson - English golfers owe...
-Ladies' Golf. By Miss A. B. Pascoe. Part 4
Certainly, the north as a whole showed more quality in its game. Frequent matches with the other side of the Tweed would act most beneficially on our style and form. There was universal satisfaction o...
-Appendix. The Championship Courses. St. Andrews, 6,323 Yards
Holes. Yards. I 352 2 417 3 .. 335 4 .. 367 5 - 516 6 .. 359 7 - 340 8 .. 170...
-Winners Of The Open Championship
1860. W. Park, sen. .. 174 at Prestwick 1861. Tom Morris, sen. .. 163 ,, 1862. Tom Morris, sen. .. 163 1863. W. Park, sen. .. 168 1864. Tom Morris, sen. .. 160 ,, ...
-Winners Of The Amateur Championship
1886. Mr. H. G. Hutchinson beat Mr. H. A. Lamb by 7 up and 6 to play, at St. Andrews. 1887. Mr. H. G. Hutchinson beat Mr. John Ball, jun., by 1 hole, at Hoylake. 1888. Mr. John Ball, jun., beat Mr....
-Glossary
Addressing the Ball The player's method of standing and handling the club preparatory to striking the ball. All Even An expression used to describe the position or result of a match when neither si...
-Rules For The Game Of Golf
Adopted By The Royal And Ancient Golf Club Of St. Andrews, 1891 1. The Game of Golf is played by two or more sides, each playing its own ball. A side may consist of one or more persons. 2. The game ...
-Rules For The Game Of Golf . Continued
20. When the balls in play lie within six inches of each other - measured from their nearest points - the ball nearer the hole shall be lifted until the other is played, and shall then be replaced as ...
-Special Rules For Golf Medal Play
1. In Club competitions, the competitor doing the stipulated course in fewest strokes shall be the winner. 2. If the lowest score be made by two or more competitors, the ties shall be decided by anot...
-Etiquette Of Golf
The following customs belong to the established Etiquette of Golf, and should be observed by all Golfers: - 1. No player, caddie, or onlooker should move or talk during a stroke. 2. No player should...
-Golf Match Play
For singles, three-fourths of difference between handicap allowances. In foursomes, three-eighths of difference of aggregate handicap allowances on cither side. A halt-stroke, or over, counts as one...
-Directory Of Leading Golf Clubs
The Royal and Ancient Golf Club. - Club House, St. Andrews, N.B. Entrance Fee, 15; Annual Subscription, 3. Hon Sec, C. S. Grace, Esq., The Club House. The Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers. ...
-Books
BY A. D. INNES AND COMPANY, LIMITED, BEDFORD ST. The Isthmian Library. Illustrated, post 8vo, cloth, 5s. a Volume. VOL. I. By B. Fletcher Robinson. Rugby Football. With Chapters by Frank Mitche...







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