Range. - Pacific coast of California and Washington.

This is a very abundant species both about habitations and in low woodlands. They are very bold and familiar, stealing everything they may take a fancy to, and frequently robbing smaller birds of their eggs and young. They are said to be more tame and familiar than the eastern Blue Jay, thereby bringing their bad habits much more frequently to the attention of the masses. They nest most often in bushes or low trees, but not as a rule, far above the ground. Their eggs are a bright bluish green color, speckled and spotted with brownish and lavender. Size 1.10 x .80.

Bright bluish green

Bright bluish green.

481 California Jay Aphelocoma Californica Californ 957

182 - 484a - 485

481a. Xantus's Jay. Aphelocoma Californica Hypoleuca

Range. - Lower California.

The habits and nests and eggs of this lighter colored variety do not differ from those of the California Jay.

481b. Belding's Jay. Aphelocoma Californica Obscura

Range. - San Pedro Martir Mts. Lower California.

A darker variety of the California Jay, whose nesting habits will not differ in any essential particular.

481.1. Santa Cruz Jay. Aphelocoma Insularis

Range. - Santa Cruz Island, California.

This species is the largest and darkest colored bird of the genus Aphelocoma. It is said to be a very abundant species on the island from which it takes its name, and to have the habits and traits common to all the members of the Jay family. The nesting habits are the same as those of the others, but the eggs are slightly larger, averaging 1.15 x .85.

set of three in the collection of John Lewis Childs, taken by R. H. Beck on May 10, 1897.