A couple of stalwart employes stood guard over the piles of silver bricks. The Eastman company is the largest consumer of silver bullion in the world, outside the United States mint, the consumption of pure bullion amounting to about a ton a week. The visitors looked at the stack of silver bricks and some of them touched the piles as they walked by. Each brick is worth approximately §250.

As a sample of the thoroughness of the equipment and the care that is taken in manufacturing the film, the company, in order to obtain per-fect salts and perfect chemicals, makes them. Nitric acid is used in connection with silver bullion to make silver nitrate. The company makes its own nitric acid. It makes its own sulphuric acid, from which, in combination with nitre, the nitric acid is made. This acid plant made necessary the enormous stack, 36(5 feet in height, the highest in America, in order to carry off the deadly poisonous gasses. Nitric acid is not only used in nitrating the silver, but it is consumed in enormous quantities for cutting the raw cotton, which forms the base of transparent films.

Showing the arrangement of C. L. Venard's First Prize Winning Exhibit on Collodio Carbon at the 1909 Illinois State Convention.

Showing the arrangement of C. L. Venard's First Prize Winning Exhibit on Collodio-Carbon at the 1909 Illinois State Convention.

Showing the arrangement of another of C. L. Venard's First p'rize Winning Exhibits on Collodio Carbon at the 1909 Illinois State Convention.

Showing the arrangement of another of C. L. Venard's First p'rize Winning Exhibits on Collodio-Carbon at the 1909 Illinois State Convention.

Paperrolls Across Continent

Paper storage is another important item in the business. In the immense storage room was stacked up 11,800 huge rolls of paper - paper enough, 41 inches wide, to reach from New York to San Francisco.

In line with the manufacture of incidental products for use in the factory is the big department for the making of paper boxes. The box factory has a capacity of 25,000 paper boxes a day. In addition, there are made millions of envelopes for papers and millions of cartons for films. The box making, which is done mainly by girls, was one of the most interesting features of the inspection.

At one end of the park is a railroad warehouse on a spur of the New York Central that is large enough for a town of several thousand inhabitants. This is used mostly for incoming freight, the outgoing product being shipped from the State street building, with the exception of the glass plates in carload lots.

The Constriction Department

There is a special construction department, with a large and fully equipped drafting room, where plans for special buildings and machinery are made by experts who know the peculiar requirements of the business. Much of the manufacturing is done in dark rooms, where ventilation becomes a matter of prime importance. In the roll-coating building, for instance, are two ventilating fans, each 160 inches in diameter, giving a complete change of air every seven minutes. Heating, cooling and ventilation in a plant of this size and with such special requirements become so important a factor that the construction department experts spend much of the time in solving the various problems of this nature that are presented and designing the special equipment required.

Another building that attracted general interest contained the lunch and rest rooms for the employes. There are two large dining rooms, one for the men and one for the women, where meals are served at cost and where nourishing food can be obtained without the loss of time that would be required to go outside for the noon lunch.

2,000 Paid Off In Ten Minutes

The last building visited was the department where applications for work are received, where the time clocks are located, showing the exact minute when each of the 2,000 park employes comes to work and leaves for the night. Here is the cashier's desk where 2,000 employes are paid off in ten minutes time each week.

At the northern end of the park the new plate building which is in process of construction was viewed with much interest. This building will be, when completed, the largest single building in the world devoted to the manufacture of photographic products. It is 357 by 338 feet and will add 229,000 square feet or five and a quarter acres to the present floor space at the park. It will have a coating capacity of nearly an acre and a quarter of glass per day. It is of reinforced concrete faced with brick and in size so far surpasses any of the other park buildings as to make them seem small in comparison.