There are two sides to every question - sometimes more, and this is especially true of the Post Card business. In the past there have been many arguments for and against Tintypes, Penny Pictures, etc., and now it is the Post Card. It seems there are those who will always object to any branch of photographic work intended to catch the spare change of a pleasure-loving, money-spending public, but the fact remains that if this money is not caught in the pockets of the photographer who makes Post Cards, it will go elsewhere, for it is the kind of money that gathers no moss - it goes too fast.

Do away with the Post Card and there will be some other photographic novelty spring up to take its place. The people, or, a certain class of people, demand these novelties, and a certain number of photographers are always willing to fill the demand. In the old days there was the Tintype man with his tent, who attended all the county fairs and was located at every beach and summer resort. He also traveled through the country in a wagon and gathered in all the loose change he could between times. Then there was the photographer who made the C. D. Vs., Petittes and all the other little "du-dads," some of them to slip in tiny cut-out mounts and some to be pasted on cards. After him came the "Penny Picture" or "Stamp Man," as he was sometimes called, and finally the Post Card Man.

From A Zelta Print By Elias Goldensky Philadelphia, Pa.

From A Zelta Print By Elias Goldensky Philadelphia, Pa.

Some photographers have gone so far as to say that the Post Card business has been a real benefit in that they attribute to it their sale of a greater number of larger sized photographs than ever before. People who have money to spend for good work take more readily to 5x7, 6x8, or 8 x 10 prints, because the Post Card has rather made the small size picture unpopular, and we certainly should not complain about our customers wanting large pictures.

Most of us buy 43/4 x 6 1/2 plates but we don't use them; that is, don't use the full size of them. We make cabinet prints when we might just as well make 4x6 - the paper costs no more.

If our cabinet paper costs us $2.00 per gross, it will cost just 6 2/3 cents more on the dozen to use 4 1/4 x 6 1/2, and 5x7 paper will cost another 6 cents more on the dozen, so why not make the most of our plates by spending a few cents more on a dozen pictures? We can not only compete with the Post Card in this way, but we can sell more pictures at better prices by giving the customer more for his money. A Post Card is smaller than a cabinet print, and in comparison with a 5 x 7 print, the difference is so great that there is no comparison.

Who will begrudge six or twelve cents on the cost of a dozen prints, when it not only gives us a better price for our pictures but meets any competition we may have on Post Cards and pleases our customers? Make a larger sized print from your cabinet negative and the customer who has five dollars or more to pay for pictures will not be satisfied with Post Cards. The one who has fifty cents or a dollar to spend will not buy four or five dollar pictures anyway.

There are lots worse things than Post Cards.

Seed Quality is Printing Quality. You deliver it to the customer in the finished print.

Advertising cut. No. 182. Price, 60 cents. See following page.

Advertising cut. No. 182. Price, 60 cents. See following page.

The Much Berated Post Card StudioLightMagazine1912 171