We have received a great many letters of inquiry regarding the method we use in our sample print department for placing titles, or rather lettering on the negative which gives us a neat, clean cut letter on the print. And as the method is very simple and may be used to advantage by any photographer who has occasion to title negatives, we give the following explanation, believing it will be appreciated by the majority of our readers:

Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 220

The Printing Outfit

Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 221

As the Title Appears on the Print

The first thing necessary is a small hand printing press and type for same. These small presses, similar to the one shown in our illustration, may usually be picked up in a secondhand store for a few dollars and will do the work as well as a larger machine. The three styles of type shown in our illustration will be sufficient for all ordinary purposes.

The title which you wish to appear on the print is set up in type, locked in the form and placed in the press. The press should be inked in the same way as for printing on paper, the ink being a fairly heavy quick drying black printer's ink.

When you have made the press ready, take an impression on a thin piece of paper to see that the type is properly inked and there are no mistakes in composition. You are now ready for the next step.

Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 222

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Melvin H. Sykes Chicago, III.

Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 223Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 224

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Melvin H. Sykes Chicago, III.

Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 225Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 226

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Melvin H. Sykes Chicago, III.

Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 227

The title is to be printed on thin, transparent film support (E. K. Co. No. 1), or thin celluloid, about .0015 of an inch thick. E. K. Co. No. 1 film support may be had from your dealer at twelve cents per square foot. Cut a piece of film support slightly larger than your negative to allow for adjusting the title on the negative. Place the film support in the press and print the title as nearly where you want it as possible. Immediately after taking this impression and while the ink is still wet, dust finely powdered lamp black over the printing. Allow about five minutes for the ink to partially dry and remove the surplus lamp black by rubbing with a tuft of clean cotton. After allowing a few minutes more for the ink to dry the film is ready for use. The lamp black is quite necessary as the ink in itself will not be sufficiently opaque to give a clean, white letter.

For glass negatives, adjust the film so the title will come where desired, cut film to size of negative and bind edges with gummed paper to prevent particles of dust from getting under the film and to prevent any slipping or sliding motion which might damage the lettering. For film negatives, first attach the film to a piece of clear glass - then adjust the title film over the negative and attach to the glass also. The title will print clean and clear, and the result will be found well worth the trouble.

Plain film support may be used as a covering for negatives and will be found an excellent protection when a great number of prints are to be made from one negative. The film may be left on the negative and will be a protection for valuable negatives that will permit their being handled without danger of being injured by finger prints or scratches.

Film support will be found valuable where it is desired to place a neat copyright mark in one corner of the print and any negative that is worth copyrighting is also worth protecting by the film covering.

Another use for film support is in blocking out one figure from a group, cutting out a bad sky or buildings adjoining the one you wish to show in your picture. Film support may be placed over a negative and any amount of opaquing may be done without injury to the negative, as the support may be removed at any time and plain prints made from the negative.

If it is desired to soften the effect of retouching, the No. 1 film support will not be heavy enough for this purpose. It is so thin that results show absolutely

Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 228

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Melvin H. Sykes Chicago, III.

Film Support As A Means Of Titling And Preserving  StudioLightMagazine1914 229

the same effects that would be secured in contact printing without the film.

Our Illustrations

Photographers once thought it was necessary to have a certain kind of skylight to make good portrait lightings. Great stress was laid on this point and each style of skylight had its champions, but since home portraiture has come to be more generally practiced many pet theories have been dissolved, and we find it isn't so much the light and the angle from which it comes that makes the lighting, as it is the man who handles it.

Our illustrations in this issue of Studio Light are a very good example of what may be accomplished by using the light from the windows of an ordinary office building. These portraits were made by Melvin H. Sykes in his new Chicago studio, among them being a number of the pictures that won prizes at the recent Illinois Convention.

Mr. Sykes' new studio, which he calls his Home Portrait Studio, is on the thirteenth floor of one of Chicago's modern Wabash Avenue sky scrapers. The windows were not specially constructed for photographic purposes, which goes to show that the results he secures must be credited to the man rather than the light he has to work with.

Mr. Sykes has made a success of his home portrait work for the same reason that he is making a success of his work in the new studio. He knows the value of light - knows how to handle it, from whatever source it may come, to secure the most pleasing effects. And he does produce beautiful lightings under conditions that would seem most unfavorable and even discouraging to the average worker.