His hobby runs to Oriental curios, a number of beautiful pieces of bronze, porcelain and carved wood, which are quite valuable because of their age and origin, being used in the decoration of his studio. It is a modern studio in every respect and was opened only a little over two years ago, so the excellent business has been entirely the result of Mr. Stearns' efforts to produce work of the highest quality and to consistently advertise photographs to the buying public.

Our illustrations are from Artura Iris prints, Artura being the paper used exclusively for portrait work in this studio.It's a Seed Plate you need.

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FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Clarence Stearns Rochester, Minn.

STAINS ON HANDS-AVOIDING AND REMOVING

Some photographers who use pyro developer continually, never have stained fingers, while others have hands so badly stained, it would seem they could never be rid of it. The best thing to do is to prevent the stain and always have the hands clean and sightly.

It is claimed that this can be done with water alone, if the following precautions are observed: Never dip dry fingers in the developer. Always have the hands wet and rinse them under a running tap before and after placing them in the developer and after having them in the hypo. Once the plates are in the developer it is just as easy to develop with wet hands as dry ones, though most people have a habit of drying their hands every time they rinse them. This habit is responsible for most of the staining, as fingers are more susceptible to the stain when dry.

Another preventive which is frequently used by those who are careful of the appearance of their hands is a weak acid rinsing solution, one ounce of hydrochloric acid to fifty ounces of water A bowl or dish of this weak acid solution is placed beside the developing tray and the fingers rinsed frequently before and after being in the developer.

To remove stain that has accumulated on the hands and nails is more difficult if it has been there for a long time. The method we use is a simple one and it is very effective. The stain remover consists of two solutions made as as follows: No. 1, one-half ounce Permanganate of Potash to fifty ounces of water, and No. 2, twenty-five ounces Bisulphite of Soda to fifty ounces of water. Rub the hands with a small amount of the No. 1 solution until a dark permanganate stain has been formed wherever there is a pyro stain. Then rinse the hands with the No. 2 solution, which will remove both the permanganate and pyro stains.

It must be remembered that permanganate is a poison and should be used with the same care as is used in handling a reducing solution.

Of course, it is better to prevent the finger stains and so do away with the idea that the photographer must necessarily bear such an unsightly mark of his profession, but if one can not form the habit of preventing stained fingers, he can at least resort to the remedy and remove the stains as often as desired.

Specify C. K. Co. Tested Chemicals and be certain of the strength and quality of the chemicals you use.

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FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Clarence Steams Rochester, Minn.

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BABY'S friends and your friends can buy anything you can give them - except your photograph.

Make the appointment to-day

THE PYRO STUDIO

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FROM A SEED PLATE NEGATIVE

Copyright by Knoffl, & Bro. Knoxville, Tenn.

STUDIO LIGHT INCORPORATING THE ARISTO EAGLE ESTABLISHED 1901 THE ARTURA BULLETIN ESTABLISHED 1906 Vol.8 SEPTEMBER 1916 No. 7