Under the caption "Using the Camera as a Tool of Management," Frank E. Gooding of the editorial staff of Factory told in the June number of that magazine of a number of ways in which the camera could be used to advantage in the office and factory. But finding the subject larger than the space allotted him, he was obliged to run a second article - "Thirty - seven Other Ways the Camera Can Help You," in the July Factory.

There are few photographers who cannot find time to take on a little extra work, but, as a rule, the photographer is not in a position to suggest ways in which photographs will be useful to the factory manager or superintendent.

Read one or both of the articles above referred to and you will have a fair list of arguments to begin a campaign for business among the factories in your locality. Possibly the man you are soliciting may be interested in these articles and see more uses for your camera than you could suggest. In any case, it may be to your interest to make a few experimental negatives, decide upon a schedule of prices for standard sizes and try to secure a contract for all the photographic work the factory may need. As a rule, one use of the camera suggests another, and once the manager sees the advantage of photographic records he will give orders to use photographs whenever and wherever they Will add to the efficiency of his organization.

From An Artura Iris Print By E. L. Mix New York.

From An Artura Iris Print By E. L. Mix New York.

Such an order will establish the use of photographs in that factory and make you and your camera a part of its organization. It is only the getting in that is difficult - once in you become a fixture.

We can give only a rough idea of some of the uses of photographs to factory managers and would suggest that the articles mentioned above be read and studied by photographers who may wish to secure this business.

Photographing damage to machinery often simplifies a report to headquarters, aids in securing new parts quickly and is often instrumental in securing improved machines to supplant antiquated equipment. Photographs of all the parts of a manufactured article also facilitate ordering of new parts, as each part can be numbered on the photograph.

Photographs of blue prints and drawings, reduced to the proper size for filing, are always at hand when wanted and are better for many purposes than the originals. It is much more convenient for the manager to consult the photograph than a full sized blue print and it will be consulted more often with less tax of memory. It is important that photographs of drawings made to scale should include the scale, or a scale in inches added, so that it will be reduced proportionately.

Carefully plotted curves or tables for calculation are always accurate if photographed and do not need to be checked up.

Photographs are valuable in showing damage to goods in transit, methods of crating or packing unusual articles, storage space occupied by bulky material, methods of assembling, setting up or repairing of complicated machinery, factory arrangement of space or order of handling material most economically, for guidance in fitting up branch factories, etc.

A very important use of photographs is in educational work along safety lines. Pictures will tell their stories so plainly and will make risks so obvious that unsafe practice will become unpopular and accident porcentages reduced. Photographs of the right and wrong way of performing a machine operation posted on the factory bulletin board are an object lesson as soon as seen and are especially necessary to safety work in factories employing people of many nationalities. The picture language is universal and pictures will do more towards teaching safety methods and checking up violations of safety rules than any other one thing. Lantern slides are also used extensively for safety lectures, and groups of safety committees add interest to shop papers.

From An Artura Iris Print By E. L. Mix New York.

From An Artura Iris Print By E. L. Mix New York.

Notwithstanding the importance attached to photographic work in many factories there are many more where the photographer is a stranger and the advantages of photographs have been overlooked. Your locality may prove a fertile field of opportunity if you can show the part photographs can play in the economy and efficiency of factory management.

On Time

Inability to produce pictures on time has cut down the profits of many photographers during the last two Christmas seasons. There's no indication that 1917 will fall behind 1915 and 1916 in the volume of holiday business, so prepare now to do all the business that will offer in a few short weeks. If you have worried along with a camera or lens that handicaps you, protect your profits by remedying the deficiency before it is too late. The same remarks apply to backgrounds and your general studio fixtures. We would advise you to go over your apparatus and accessories and replace those that have been or are likely to be a cause of loss to you through failure to produce your pictures punctually.

September. Bulletin: The Eastman School Of Professional Photography For 1917

Lynchburg, Va..........September 18, 19, 20

Atlanta, Ga...........September 25, 26, 27

Nashville, Tenn...........October 2, 3, 4

Louisville, Ky...........October 9, 10, 11

From An Artura Iris Print By E. L. Mix New York.

From An Artura Iris Print By E. L. Mix New York.

The Pyro Studio Line cut No. 243. Price 50 cents.

The Pyro Studio Line cut No. 243. Price 50 cents.

Artura Iris Print From Standard Polychrome Negative By Morrison Studio Chicago, III.

Artura Iris Print From Standard Polychrome Negative By Morrison Studio Chicago, III.