Frequently there is a call for a wide angle view to take in a wider range than any lens can cover. This problem is easily handled in the case of landscapes or outside groups by the use of a Panoramic Camera, but sometimes the photographer does not possess one of these instruments or, having one, finds it unavailable in the case of interiors or other subjects where the illumination is such as to require time exposures.

To match up two or more negatives so as to give a continuous view with no signs of a break where the negatives join is not extremely difficult, although requiring careful handling and a right start.

In the first place, it is necessary to make the different negatives from exactly the same point of view, otherwise the lines will not register correctly. To do this the lens must be pivoted exactly over the tripod screw so that when swinging camera from side to side the position of the lens remains unchanged. The camera must also be perfectly level. The position of the camera on the tripod is shown in Cut No. 1.

After having made the first negative, the camera should be swung so as to take an additional section of the view, but the second view should lap over into the first one about an inch on an 8 x 10 negative, and the third lap into the second in the same way.

Artura Iris Print From Standard Polychrome Negative By Morrison Studio Chicago, Ill.

Artura Iris Print From Standard Polychrome Negative By Morrison Studio Chicago, Ill.

Wide Angle Views From Matched Negatives StudioLightMagazine1917 222

No. 1.

The method of matching and marking negatives is shown in Cut No. 2. Negatives may be marked by scratching the film at the top and bottom of each pair of plates, or by using a narrow strip of gummed paper and marking with a lead pencil. Marks must come exactly opposite on both plates when negatives are in register. Note a, a and b, b. For convenience in printing, it is a good idea to take an ordinary Century printing frame and cut out the ends as shown in Cut No. 3. The dotted lines indicate where the wood has been cut away to prevent paper from creasing.

Cut No. 4. shows the method of printing. A continuous strip of sensitized paper long enough for the several negatives is used. One end of the paper is placed in contact with the first negative and is carefully marked to correspond with the marks on the negative. The long end of the paper is then passed out through the printing frame and is rolled up and covered to protect it from the light. A narrow strip of cardboard is tacked on the front of the frame, just over and a little beyond the mark on the negative, as a vignetter. The printing should be done under a diffused light as the idea of the vignetter is to have the print from the second negative blend into the first, and the third into the second, so that it will not be easy to see where negatives are joined. The position of the vignetter is most important. If placed too far over, it will give a diffused light line across the print, and if not far enough, a dark line. Some experimenting with narrow strips of printing paper to secure correct adjustment may be necessary where prints are made on developing paper. If printing out paper is used, the print can be examined from time to time and the vignetter shifted slightly as required to get a perfect blend.

After making the first print, the second negative is placed in the printing frame and preparations made for the printing. The mark on the paper which registered with the mark on the first negative must now come in register with the mark on the second negative. The first printing is, of course, rolled up at one end of the frame, and the un-printed section of paper will extend across the negative and is again rolled up and covered.

When printing from the first and third negatives a cardboard strip at only one end of the printing frame is required, but when printing from the second or center negative two strips are required as in this case both ends of the print are to be vignetted. The third print is handled very much the same as the first.

Exact matching and perfect blending depend upon careful marking of negatives and paper, and a correct adjustment of the vignetter. Of course, the negatives should all be of the same character and printed to equal depth.

When photographing interiors, the best place to join the several views is at the corner of a room, some place where vertical lines predominate, although this is not really necessary if when making negatives the lens is correctly centered.

Wide Angle Views From Matched Negatives StudioLightMagazine1917 223

No. 2.

Wide Angle Views From Matched Negatives StudioLightMagazine1917 224

No. 3.

Wide Angle Views From Matched Negatives StudioLightMagazine1917 225

No. 4.

Artura Iris Print From Standard Polychrome Negative By Morrison Studio Chicago, Ill.

Artura Iris Print From Standard Polychrome Negative By Morrison Studio Chicago, Ill.