Every photographer knows that the best profits are to be secured from the highest grade of work. He knows how valuable the high grade business is, but he does not always know how to change over from the grade of work he is producing to the more profitable work.

A Columbus, Ohio, photographer has a method of doing this in operation in his studio that is worthy of adoption. The method is so simple that any photographer can use it to improve the class of work he is doing. It has had a wonderful effect on the business of the Columbus photographer and if adopted will prove to be a simple "trading up" process that will affect the whole business.

The method followed by this photographer may best be illustrated by showing how it works out with mothers who bring the baby in to have its first photograph taken. The mother informs the receptionist that she brought the baby in to have its photograph taken. After the usual preliminaries, for every mother expects that a certain amount of fuss will be made over her baby, the receptionist, instead of bringing out a lot of sample photographs and mounts, shows one or two high class photographs and diplomatically proceeds to find out the limit the mother will go for the work.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.

After learning the amount she is willing to pay for the photographs, the next thing to be decided is the quantity she requires. The natural reply is "a dozen." She thinks of buying photographs in dozens and in no other quantities. She has always thought that is the way they should be purchased. The photographer is responsible for this, of course, for he has made it a custom.

"Do you really need a dozen?" the receptionist asks, much to the mother's astonishment. She follows up the question before the mother has quite recovered by asking, "Wouldn't a few less serve your purpose just as well?"

Sometimes the mother immediately protests that she needs a dozen, but often she appears to consider the question. The receptionist then follows up her questions with a tactful explanation of the reason for the query. "Most people who buy a dozen photographs find that after they have given one to each of their particular friends and relatives and have reserved one for the home, there are three or four left. Of course, these are apportioned out, but to people who would perhaps be just as well satisfied with a less expensive picture."

Unless the woman is unusually insistent for a dozen, it is suggested that she make out a list of those to whom she would like to give a very fine photograph of the baby. Nearly always the list is made out and halts at seven or eight. The intimation that several pictures are practically wasted where a dozen are ordered, has taken root. She is of course, reminded that she can have more prints made from the same negative at any time she wishes if she finds she needs them.

This usually brings the transaction down to a definite quantity at a definite price. The receptionist then proceeds to show the styles of work that can be had for the money the mother is willing to pay. A selection is made and the customer is pleased with the better work when she receives it. The photographer has done the same volume of business with less work and has a better chance of a duplicate order.

If samples had been shown at first and the customer urged to buy the higher grades of work with the dozen idea in mind, the better sale would have been lost and the customer probably offended. If the customer had bought the higher grade of work under the old fashioned brand of salesmanship, she would always believe she had been coerced into doing so.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa Okla.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa Okla.

The Columbus photographer finds that in practically every case that comes to him, when his method is followed, the sale works out to his advantage. He has built up a higher grade business. He is making more money. His reputation for good work is gaining. What more could a photographer want?

This idea is really not a new one, however, for another method of accomplishing practically the same result is the individual print price idea. In some cases a flat price is placed on one or any number of prints, but more often it is so much for the first three prints and the duplicate price for each additional print.

By this plan you would charge for$30.00 per dozen work,$12.00 for the first three prints and $2.00 each for additional prints. Your scale of prices can be carefully figured out for any number of prints, so that the customer who is willing to spend any given amount can be quickly shown just how many prints of any style he can buy for the amount he wishes to spend, or what the cost of any number of prints will be for any style of work.

In any event, if you know your customer is willing to spend $20.00 and wants seven pictures, it is much better policy to sell seven high grade pictures for $20.00 than to sell a dozen cheaper pictures for $20.00. When the seven pictures are gone the customer may buy the other five for an extra $10.00, while if you have sold a dozen where only seven are really needed, the extra five are a reminder of the purchaser's extravagance.

"Buy conservatively" should be your advice to the purchaser if you wish to sell high grade work. Then sell what the customer is willing to buy - not in numbers but in quality - as high grade work as you can afford to make for the number of prints wanted. A few prints of quality at a good price.

You get better results on Film because you reproduce what you see, as you see it. It is Film Quality the quality that makes the one time impossible things simple.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.