The old maxim: "Appearances don't count," should be taken by photographers with the proverbial grain of salt. As a matter of fact, in photography appearances count for a great deal.

You know perfectly well that you could set a white and flawless diamond in a common brass setting, and the average person would look upon it as paste and pass it by. The diamond experts, of course, would at once perceive its true value - but diamond experts are not common.

It is just the same in your business. You may make fine pictures; the posing, lighting, printing and everything may be first-class, but if you mount your pictures on cheap, inappropriate mounts, away goes their value in the eyes of ninety per cent. of your customers. True enough the art critic or picture expert would notice their merits. The vast majority of your customers, however, are not art critics or picture experts, and if you want them to appreciate your good work at its full value, you must make it appear as good work when you present it to them. You must dress your pictures to correspond with your ideas of their value, because the money-spending public will value the quality of your picture-gems by their settings.

Take one of your best prints, put it on a cheap, common-looking mount, and its market value becomes nothing more than the value suggested by the mount. Put the same print, however, on an up-to-date artistic mount, or in a dainty appropriate folder, and its value at once rises to whatever your customers are prepared to pay for high-class work. The difference in the cost of production is very small, but the difference in the net profit is enormous.

There is no part of your work where appearances count so much as in the mounting of your pictures . For this reason you should select your mounts with the greatest care and discrimination. If the man down the street fills his window or show case with a new line of mounts, don't copy his particular style, but try to go one better in good taste and refinement.

Your dealers have their fall line of mounts and folders and you will find there settings for your pictures that will raise the value of your work in the eyes of the public. Make a display of these new mounts and folders, and the stimulating effect it will have upon your business will be an agreeable surprise to you.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By C. L. Lewis Studios Toledo, Ohio.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By C. L. Lewis Studios Toledo, Ohio.

Don't be misled; appearances do count.

September. Practical Suggestions

It becomes necessary sometimes for the photographer to fill up tiny holes or cracks in the woodwork of his camera, and to do this he is often at a loss to find a substance that will do the work thoroughly, and dry with a matt, black surface. A most useful cement that will harden like stone can be made in the following way: pour a little of LePage's glue into a saucer and mix it with some fine plaster of paris and a little lamp black until it forms a thick paste. Use a small knife to fill up the cracks or holes in the wood and scrape away all the superfluous paste before it gets time to harden. In a few days it will be as hard as a rock.

Architects and engineers, who use blue-print copies of their plans and drawings, are very grateful when prints are supplied to them in a waterproof condition. They are often compelled to refer to drawings in the open air, and in all kinds of weather, with the result that the prints very soon get into a dilapidated condition. A good method of waterproofing blue prints is to saturate them with melted paraffin wax. The most convenient way of doing this is to soak in the melted wax a number of pieces of absorbent cloth, a foot or more square, and when cool spread some of these pieces of cloth on the table and lay the print on top of them, and then again on top of the print lay some more pieces of cloth. When this is done, it is only necessary to iron them with a hot iron. The paper will immediately absorb the paraffin until saturated.

You can secure any good result on a film that you can secure on a glass plate. The results you secure on film that you cannot secure on plates, however, are the results that are responsible for the constantly growing number of Portrait Film enthusiasts.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By C. L. Lewis Studios Toledo, Ohio.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By C. L. Lewis Studios Toledo, Ohio.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By C. L. Lewis Studios Toledo, Ohio.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By C. L. Lewis Studios Toledo, Ohio.

September Practical Suggestions StudioLightMagazine1919 217Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By L. J. Buckley Binghamton, N. Y.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By L. J. Buckley Binghamton, N. Y.